Marc T. Hamilton

Editorial Board Member

Marc T. Hamilton, PhD
Director, Texas Obesity Research Center
Professor, Texas Medical Center, University of Houston, USA

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Biography

Professor Marc Hamilton, Ph.D is currently Director of the Texas Obesity Research Center, an affiliate of the University of Houston and the Texas Medical Center. His laboratory group has defined underlying biochemical and molecular triggers impairing health during physical inactivity and has been focusing on developing novel yet pragmatic lifestyle solutions for people who do not exercise and must sit for prolonged periods. He introduced a new paradigm of “inactivity physiology” (distinct from exercise physiology) during the past decade and proposed several tenets that are leading to a new way of thinking about health consequences of physical inactivity, or “sitting too much”.

Work has included molecular and biochemical insights for how plasma lipoprotein metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and thrombotic risks are impacted by skeletal muscle use in animal models and human volunteers. Clinical investigations are currently underway taking aim at disease prevention and treatment in people who can not exercise, but can perform an innovative muscular activity therapy for many hours each day. Dr. Hamilton was honored as distinguished alumni from the University of South Carolina School of Public Health (Exercise Science Department) and obtained postdoctoral training at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston. He previously was on faculty in the Biomedical Science Department and Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Missouri and was a Professor at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Louisiana.

Research Interest

Dr. Marc T. Hamilton research interests include:

  • Role of physical activity and immobility on blood risk factors
  • Plasma lipid and glucose metabolism
  • Deep vein thrombosis and other blood disorders during muscular disuse

Publications

Recommended Conferences

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