Journal of Spine & NeurosurgeryISSN: 2325-9701

Neuroendoscopy

Neuroendoscopy is a minimally-invasive surgical procedure in which the neurosurgeon removes the tumor through small holes (about the size of a dime) in the skull or through the mouth or nose. Neuroendoscopy enables neurosurgeons to: Access areas of the brain that cannot be reached with traditional surgery, Remove the tumor without cutting or harming other parts of the skull. The neuroendoscopy is performed using an endoscope, a small telescope-like device equipped with a high-resolution video camera and eye piece on the end to allow the neurosurgeon to navigate and access the tumor. To remove a tumor or take a sample of it (a biopsy), neurosurgeons attach special instruments to the endoscope, often an additional endoscope with forceps and scissors on the end.Neuroendoscopy began with a desire to visualize the ventricles and deeper structures of the brain. Unfortunately, the technology available to early neuroendoscopists was not sufficient in most cases for these purposes. The unique perspective that neuroendoscopy offered was not fully realized until key technological advances made reliable and accurate visualization of the brain and ventricles possible. Because of its characteristically less invasive nature, neuroendoscopy has a number of advantages over the traditional surgical procedures.Despite the advantages, there are some complicating issues around neuroendoscopy that might not always be easily tackled or avoided. Performing a neuroendoscopic procedure requires a highly specialized and trained neurosurgeon, meaning the availability of this procedure is normally restricted to a small number of specialized medical facilities.

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