Journal of Biodiversity Management & ForestryISSN: 2327-4417

Reach Us +1 (850) 754 6199

Research Article, J Biodivers Manage Forestry Vol: 3 Issue: 4

A Survey of Attitudes towards Human-Baboon Conflicts in a University Campus in Ethiopia

Murali Pai* and Seada Aliwo
Department of Biology, Arba Minch University, P.O. Box 21, Arba Minch Gamo Gofa Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia
Corresponding author : Murali Pai
Department of Biology, Arba Minch University, P.O. Box 21, Arba Minch Gamo Gofa Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia
E-mail: [email protected]
Received June 19, 2014 Accepted October 16, 2014 Published October 20, 2014
Citation: Pai M, Aliwo S (2014) A Survey of Attitudes towards Human–Baboon Conflicts in a University Campus in Ethiopia. J Biodivers Manage Forestry 3:4. doi:10.4172/2327-4417.1000131

Abstract

A Survey of Attitudes towards Human–Baboon Conflicts in a University Campus in Ethiopia

A study on human-baboon conflicts was conducted by undergraduate researchers in Biology at Arba Minch University (AMU). Its aim was to survey residents in the Main Campus of AMU affected by increasing conflicts between people and olive baboons (Papio anubis). Baboons raid residents housing for food, damage buildings and have been trapped and released in alternate sites in the past. A survey questionnaire with 20 questions was distributed to residents (n=60), the responses coded, and the data statistically analyzed using software STATA 11. The results of the survey have given new insights on baboon conflicts with people in AMU Campus. Most people want issues concerning conflicts with baboon to be dealt with ‘as is where is’ basis and not by getting rid of them. On the other hand, the same majority does not seem to equate baboons with wildlife and don’t believe it is important to conserve them. This perception is probably stems from the nuisance value of baboons, given the threats they pose to human safety and property. In conclusion, an awareness drive is needed to try resolving human-baboon conflicts and achieve human-wildlife coexistence in a rapidly urbanizing Ethiopia.
 

Keywords: Human-baboon conflicts; Survey of attitudes; Coexistence; Ethiopia

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page