Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders & Treatment ISSN: 2324-8947

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Effects of Minocycline on Changes in Brain Tryptophan Metabolism and the Behavior of Juvenile Mice Elicited By Inescapable-Predator Stress

Effects of Minocycline on Changes in Brain Tryptophan Metabolism and the Behavior of Juvenile Mice Elicited By Inescapable-Predator Stress

Traumatic stress in early life can have long-term effects on neurobiological systems and result in morepronounced responses to stress exposure in adulthood, which may underlie an increased risk of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety disorder (including post-traumatic stress disorder). Acute stress in early life activates the brain kynurenine (KYN) pathway, the main tryptophan (TRP) metabolic pathway, which shares TRP with the serotonin (5-HT) pathway. Although the activated KYN pathway is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, it may also be related to neurobiological changes elicited by stress.

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