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The outcome of prevention mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV infection at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, the western region of Saudi Arabia: a descriptive study

Infectious Diseases: Prevention and Control.

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The outcome of prevention mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV infection at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, the western region of Saudi Arabia: a descriptive study

B ackground: The majority of HIV infected children acquire the infection from their mother, with increases in the prevalence among childbearing women; the burden of HIV has an impact on infants' outcomes worldwide. Enforces the policy of routine antenatal HIV screening tests, early detection of maternal disease would inhibit vertical transmission. This study aims to describe the PMTCT of HIV at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Saudi Arabia for over ten years and demonstrate that a mandatory approach to antenatal HIV screening and treatment significantly has the potential to reduce vertical transmission of HIV. Method: A retrospective study enrolled 18 HIV-positive mothers and their 26 infants, from 2009 to 2018 at KAUH. PMTCT had applied for all mothers and their infants with the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 076 Study Group. Result: All mothers received antiretroviral therapy (ART), except one who was diagnosed at the 27th week of gestation. (83%) of them complied with regimens, and (11%) have ART resistance. HIV PCR was undetectable in (65.4%) of pregnancies. Seven mothers had an opportunistic infection. Based on infants' HIV PCR test follow-up, the transmission rate of HIV was 0% with either spontaneous vaginal delivery or cesarean section (CS). Conclusion: A lot of challenges are facing the efforts to decrease vertical HIV transmission, with a particular focus on the transitions between stages of care is needed. We believe that applying antenatal early screening, counseling, regular follow up, ART, an elective (CS) with detectable viral load, and exclusive formula feeding contributed to MTCT elimination.

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