International Journal of Ophthalmic PathologyISSN: 2324-8599

Ocular oncology

Eye cancer refers to a cancerous growth in any part of the eye. Some eye cancers are primary, while others represent metastases from primary cancers elsewhere in the body. Ocular oncology is the branch of medicine dealing with tumors relating to the eye and its adnexa. Eye cancer can affect all parts of the eye. Eye cancers can be primary (starts within the eye) and metastatic cancer (spread to the eye from another organ). The two most common cancers that spread to the eye from another organ are breast cancer and lung cancer. Other less common sites of origin include the prostate, kidney, thyroid, skin, colon and blood or bone marrow. The Services provided are Evaluation and management of cancers of the eye and adnexa, Eyelid and Orbital Tumors, Intraocular Tumors, Retinoblastoma. Ocular oncology is a multidisciplinary service which includes general oncologists, paediatric oncologists, specialist nurses, clinical scientists and many others. The most common malignancies include uveal and conjunctival melanoma, uveal metastasis, intraocular and conjunctival lymphoma and conjunctival carcinoma. Diagnosis is based on bio microscopy, ultrasonography, angiography, optical coherence tomography, auto fluorescence imaging and biopsy. The most common benign tumors include naevi, chorodal hemangiomas. The most common type of cancer to affect the eye is ocular melanoma, or melanoma of the eye.Symptoms includes blurred vision, flashing lights, shadows and cataracts. Retinoblastoma is a rare type of eye cancer that affects children younger than five. It is usually caught and treated early in the UK, which is why over 98% of children with retinoblastoma are successfully treated.

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