International Journal of Ophthalmic PathologyISSN: 2324-8599

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina). Diabetic retinopathy is the result of micro-vascular retinal changes. Hyperglycemia-induced intramural pericyte death and thickening of the basement membrane lead to incompetence of the vascular walls. These damages change the formation of the blood-retinal barrier and also make the retinal blood vessels become more permeable. It is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80 percent of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new blindness in persons aged 25-74 years in the United States. Approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have proliferative diabetic retinopathy, with an annual incidence of 65,000. Diabetic retinopathy involves the abnormal growth of blood vessels in the retina. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is the more advanced form of the disease. At this stage, new fragile blood vessels can begin to grow in the retina and into the vitreous, the gel-like fluid that fills the back of the eye. The new blood vessel may leak blood into the vitreous, clouding vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the result of damage caused by diabetes to the small blood vessels located in the retina. Blood vessels damaged from diabetic retinopathy can cause vision loss. Treatment for diabetic retinopathy depends on the stage of the disease and is directed at trying to slow or stop the progression of the disease.

Recommended Conferences

Share This Page