Journal of Biodiversity Management & ForestryISSN: 2327-4417

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Research Article, J Biodivers Manage Forestry Vol: 3 Issue: 1

Out of the Woods: Mitigating Negative Impacts of Unused Forest Roads on Amphibians with Woody Debris

David LeGros1,2* Brad Steinberg3 and David Lesbarrères2
1Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Algonquin Provincial Park, P.O. Box 249, Whitney Ontario K0J 2M0, Canada
2Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury Ontario, P3E 2C6, Canada
3Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Parks and Protected Areas Policy Section, 300 Water St. Peterborough Ontario, 6th Floor K9J 8M5, Canada
Corresponding author : David LeGros
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Algonquin Provincial Park, P.O. Box 249, Whitney Ontario K0J 2M0, Canada
Tel:
(613) 637-2828 extn. 223
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: October 09, 2013 Accepted: January 28, 2014 Published: January 31, 2014
Citation: LeGros D, Steinberg B, Lesbarrères D (2014) Out of the Woods: Mitigating Negative Impacts of Unused Forest Roads on Amphibians with Woody Debris. J Biodivers Manage Forestry 3:1. doi:10.4172/2327-4417.1000119

Abstract

Out of the Woods: Mitigating Negative Impacts of Unused Forest Roads on Amphibians with Woody Debris

Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the most serious threats facing amphibians. While less noticeable than highways and with typically little vehicle traffic, extensive networks of logging roads also fragment habitats and some species avoid crossing these roads. Woody debris is an important habitat feature for many amphibians providing refuges and foraging opportunities for species sheltering underneath. In an attempt to mitigate the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation by logging roads in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada, we sampled amphibians crossing an unused logging road using pitfall traps and tested several types of woody debris treatments. Using the ‘before’ and ‘after’, ‘control’ and ‘impact’ (BACI) model, we compared captures of Red-backed Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus), Red Efts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans) in 2010 (pre-treatment) and 2011 (post-treatment); the treatments consisted of either hardwood mulch, conifer brush, timbers and a control with no woody debris. Our results with pitfall traps indicated specific responses to mitigation with Green Frogs showing positive responses to the brush and timber treatments, while both salamander species showed little response.

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