Journal of Aging and Geriatric Medicine.ISSN: 2576-3946

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Editorial, J Aging Geriatr Med Vol: 4 Issue: 2

Adavances in Covid-19

Howard A Palley*

Department of Social Policy, University of Maryland, Maryland, USA

*Corresponding Author : Palley HA
Department of Social Policy, University of Maryland, Maryland, USA
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: April 06, 2020 Accepted: April 16, 2020 Published: April 30, 2020

Citation: Palley HA (2020) Adavances in Covid-19. J Aging Geriatr Med 4:2. doi: 10.37532/agm.2020.4(2).e106

Abstract

There is a need for a more active and direct national role for the federal government in responding to the spreading of corona virus (COVID-19) especially concerning the elderly as the most vulnerable risk group. According to preliminary data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the U.S., 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of intensive care admissions and 80% of deaths due to the corona virus occurred among people 65 and older. The highest percentage of deaths, 34%, associated with this virus, has been among people 85 and older. The first corona virus case in the U.S. and South Korea was detected on the same day, January 19, 2020. By late January, the South Korean government had its medical companies working on a diagnostic test that was approved a week later and which contributed to the tracing of the impact of the virus and the application of public health measures to contain the spread of the virus. The U.S. still has not developed an adequate supply of test of the corona virus. Since we are, to some extent, “flying blind” this situation requires national social distancing as a mechanism for containing the spread of a virus that does not respect state lines

Keywords: COVID-19, corona virus , N95 face masks

Editorial

There is a need for a more active and direct national role for the federal government in responding to the spreading of corona virus (COVID-19) especially concerning the elderly as the most vulnerable risk group. According to preliminary data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the U.S., 45% of hospitalizations, 53% of intensive care admissions and 80% of deaths due to the corona virus occurred among people 65 and older. The highest percentage of deaths, 34%, associated with this virus, has been among people 85 and older.

The first corona virus case in the U.S. and South Korea was detected on the same day, January 19, 2020. By late January, the South Korean government had its medical companies working on a diagnostic test that was approved a week later and which contributed to the tracing of the impact of the virus and the application of public health measures to contain the spread of the virus. The U.S. still has not developed an adequate supply of test of the corona virus. Since we are, to some extent, “flying blind” this situation requires national social distancing as a mechanism for containing the spread of a virus that does not respect state lines.

Moreover, since the virus is not limited by state boundaries, there is a need for direct intervention by the national government, to secure a much greater availability of tests for the virus and equipment for physicians another medical personnel dealing with diagnosis and treatment of patients such a N95 face masks and ventilators. The basic problem of state by state response is that the virus does not respect state lines. We need all the tools that the nation can provide in order to effectively deal with the impact of this international pandemic and this can only be achieved with a more active and vigorous national role with regard to financing and to the provision of physical resources that only our national government can provide. In this regard, the failure of the federal administration to implement Presidential power under the Defense Production Act by taking action to enhance production and allocation of medical equipment such as N95 face masks, ventilators and other needed equipment for physicians and other deliverers of healthcare services would undermine the healthcare systems ability to deliver needed services to patients both those suffering from the corona virus and those in the general population with a range of needed healthcare services.

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