Journal of Plant Physiology & Pathology ISSN: 2329-955X

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Perspective, J Plant Physiol Pathol Vol: 10 Issue: 3

Cutting down forest trees for tiny houses has caused changes in nature

Luciana Buriana*
Department of Environmental science, Professor at St. Joseph College of research, Boston, United States

Corresponding author: Luciana Buriana
Department of Environmental science, Professor at St. Joseph College of research, Boston, United States
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: 03 March, 2022; Manuscript No. JPPP-22-57087;
Editor assigned date: 04 March, 2022; PreQC No. JPPP-22-57087 (PQ);
Reviewed date: 21 March, 2022; QC No JPPP -22-57087;
Revised date: 28 March, 2022; Manuscript No. JPPP-22-57087 (R);
Published date: 02 April, 2022; DOI: 10.4172/jppp.10000113

Citation: Luciana (2022) Cutting down forest trees for tiny houses has caused changes in nature.. J Plant Physiol pathol 10:3

Keywords: tiny houses , Nature

Introduction

The precursor to the Tiny House was the shotgun shack, a small, narrow single-story building in widespread use among urban black Americans from the late 19th century until the Great Depression of the 1930s. Although few of these houses had more than two bedrooms, they provided accommodation for entire blue collar families in Southern United States cities like New Orleans.

Henry David Thoreau and the publication of his book Walden are often quoted as early inspiration. The modern movement is considered by some to have started in the 1970s, with artists such as Allan Wexler investigating the concept of choosing to live in compact space early pioneers include Lloyd Kahn, author of Shelter (1973) and Lester Walker, author of Tiny Houses (1987). Sarah Susana started the "counter movement" for smaller houses which she details in her book The Not So Big House (1997)

Jay Shafer...built his first tiny house in Iowa, in 1999, and lived in it for five years. It was a hundred and ten square feet [10 m2], with a steep gabled roof and a porch.

Tiny houses on wheels were popularized by Jay Shafer who designed and lived in a 96-square-foot (8.9 m2) house and later went on to offer the first plans for tiny houses on wheels, initially founding Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, and then Four Lights Tiny House Company on September 6, 2012. In 2002, Shafer cofounded, along with Greg Johnson, Shay Salomon and Nigel Valdez, the Small House Society. Salomon and Valdez subsequently published their guide to the modern Small House Movement, Little House on a Small Planet (2006) and Johnson published his memoir, Put Your Life on a Diet (2008).

Tiny House Giant Journey travels through the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona while an RV drives by. With the Great Recession hitting the world's economy from 2007 to 2009, the small house movement attracted more attention as it offered affordable, ecologically friendly housing. Overall, it represented a very small part of real estate transactions. Thus, only 1% of home buyers acquire houses of 1,000 square feet (93 m2) or less. Small houses are also used as accessory dwelling units (or ADUs), to serve as additional on-property housing for aging relatives or returning children, as a home office, or as a guest house. Tiny houses typically cost about $20,000 to $50,000 as of 2012.

Tiny House Giant Journey travels through the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona while an RV drives by.

With the Great Recession hitting the world's economy from 2007 to 2009, the small house movement attracted more attention as it offered affordable, ecologically friendly housing. Overall, it represented a very small part of real estate transactions. Thus, only 1% of home buyers acquire houses of 1,000 square feet (93 m2) or less. Small houses are also used as accessory dwelling units (ADU).

Changes in Environment and effects

Human beings have been the main contributors in recent environmental changes. One critical proponent of these changes relates to infrastructure; buildings affect both human beings and the environment. However the costs tend to effect the environment while the benefits are exclusive to humans. The intention of building new infrastructure is to guarantee its sustainability for a long period of time. As a result, the less environmentally intentional a facility is, the more it will depend on consumption of natural resources. “Part of the very definition of a tiny home is that it be constructed with environmentally conscious and renewable materials.” Most tiny homes are designed to receive their services in ways that are less environmentally exhaustible. Electrical grids and public utilities are a distinguishable way tiny homes receive various water, electric and plumbing services. This detail is critical for consideration when individuals move from average sized homes to tiny homes because it allows individuals to both save money while using less environmental resources. Another important environmentally conscious feature relates to toilets. Some tiny homes are equipped with incinerator toilets which get rid of waste by burning it rather than flushing. By eliminating toilet flushing, the amount of water used in a household significantly decreases. An alternative feature is a compost toilet which works by decomposing the waste using evaporation to remove it. Therefore, not only are tiny homes energy efficient, the makeup of these homes are also intended to be environmentally friendly. Subsequently, in order for new materials to be both utilized in construction and sustainable for long periods of time, the production of such materials are dependent on various chemicals; this added step removes additional resources from the environment. An alternative to this is the usage of recycled materials. The tiny homes designed by a group in Texas consciously avoid using new materials in their construction. Because 30–40% of energy consumption is expended by human beings, it has been argued that infrastructure is best fit to include the consumption of humans within its blueprints.

Homelessness is a critical issue in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, about 550,000 individuals were experiencing homelessness on a given night in 2018.Over half of those individuals were able to sleep in different types of shelters while roughly thirty-five percent were unable to reside in a sheltered area. Despite the little information provided on this issue in popular media, homelessness has the capacity to affect the environment dramatically. According to the Environmental Council of Sacramento, homelessness is a contributor to environmental deterioration. For example, waste [litter, drug paraphernalia, etc.] produced by the homeless accumulates around their living spaces which tend to be near waterways, sewage systems, or parks. This leads to the contamination of the surrounding ecosystem. The Environmental Council offers steps towards conserving the environment while simultaneously dealing with the issue of homelessness. These steps include the cleaning of various water systems and public spaces in order to provide both clean water and clean areas for all individuals of the community. One of these steps also includes governmental intervention in establishing sanitary and safe spaces for the homeless in order to prevent further environmental destruction. Luckily, systems for just that are beginning to form though the tiny house movement.

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