Journal of Aging and Geriatric MedicineISSN: 2576-3946

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Opinion Article, J Aging Geriatr Med Vol: 6 Issue: 1

Demographic Contexts of Food Insecurity in Orders

Costley Alex*

Department of Health Sciences and Professional Programs, City University of New York, USA

*Corresponding author: Costley Alex, Department of Health Sciences and Professional Programs, City University of New York, USA, E-mail: [email protected] 

Received date: 07 December, 2021, Manuscript No. AGM-22-58518;

Editor assigned date: 09 December, 2021, PreQC No. AGM-22-58518 (PQ);

Reviewed date: 23 December, 2021, QC No AGM-22-58518;

Revised date: 28 December, 2021, Manuscript No. AGM-22-58518 (R);

Published date: 07 January, 2022, DOI: 10.4172/2576-3946.1000121

Citation: Costley Alex (2022) Demographic Contexts of Food Insecurity in Orders. J Aging Geriatr Med 6:1.

Abstract

The significance of story has long been honored in the field of aging. But stories differ. In this brief tract, I want to suggest the benefit of a deep story radically inclusive of what's unknown or neglected. This will enable a full story to crop which has the implicit to be transubstantiating. While this can be at any time in life, there are advantages that an aged person, with considerable life experience, can bring to this task. Why story? The value of a particular story or narrative has been appreciated in minding for the aged. Robert Butler developed the idea of a ‘life review ‘which becomes important as we develop. Indeed, Crites noted that narrative is the way we structure mortal experience, “Knowledge grasps its objects in an innately temporal way, and that its temporality is retained in the continuity of its experience as a whole”. Certain kinds of mortal understanding are irreducibly narrative in form. This is potentially integrative and remedial. Penne baker and Segal noted some advantages, “The beauty of a narrative is that it allows us to tie all the changes of our life into a broad comprehensive story”. There are narrative approaches in colorful disciplines, but a many that have fascinated me include narrative remedy and narrative theology

Keywords: Demographic

Description

The significance of story has long been honored in the field of aging. But stories differ. In this brief tract, I want to suggest the benefit of a deep story radically inclusive of what's unknown or neglected. This will enable a full story to crop which has the implicit to be transubstantiating. While this can be at any time in life, there are advantages that an aged person, with considerable life experience, can bring to this task. Why story? The value of a particular story or narrative has been appreciated in minding for the aged. Robert Butler developed the idea of a ‘life review ‘which becomes important as we develop. Indeed, Crites noted that narrative is the way we structure mortal experience, “Knowledge grasps its objects in an innately temporal way, and that its temporality is retained in the continuity of its experience as a whole”. Certain kinds of mortal understanding are irreducibly narrative in form. This is potentially integrative and remedial. Penne baker and Segal noted some advantages, “The beauty of a narrative is that it allows us to tie all the changes of our life into a broad comprehensive story”. There are narrative approaches in colorful disciplines, but a many that have fascinated me include narrative remedy and narrative theology.

Demographic Contexts

More lately the field of narrative gerontology has developed. This has been applied in colorful ways including avoiding “narrative foreclosure”, taking openings for “narrative form”, and the creative expression of an evolving “life myth” in liar. It has been seen as a means of promoting wisdom and chancing labels of preponderance. It's a verity about the person “that is always on the move”. All have plant benefit with the aged. I would also add that in story there's an easy integration of church. This has also developed into spiritual reminiscence in the work of Elizabeth Mack inlay. It's relatively natural for people to tell stories, but the problem is in what's missing. Generally the first chapters are unknown. The story is‘edited ‘with inferior corridor unacknowledged and left out. Occasionally the story has no consonance, leading nowhere, and no overall purpose or meaning. This is what the idea of a deep story tries to address. A rich language of story has surfaced. The terms include reminiscence, life review, life history and ‘story- telling’. These have been used kindly interchangeably, but some distinctions have been made. Generally, reminiscence is associated with remedy and change, life history with exploration and life review with the evaluation Andre-synthesis of recollections. It's extensively honored that telling one’s story can help a process of recovery.

Standard Federal Poverty Level

The telling can begin at any age. But as we get aged we get better at coming to terms with our history, generally gaining a instigation of positive change and frequently find the courage to face what ‘lies ahead’. The crucial idea is that maturity, gained with age and experience, makes us better suitable to integrate ‘the rough and the smooth ‘of life. Ask someone to tell their story. Generally you'll get a admixture of remembered incidents and ‘sluice of knowledge’. Some will show a degree of sapience. Maybe an acceptance of painful events. The story may have a plot with a sense of meaning or life purpose. It may show some consonance. Maybe indeed some spiritual understanding. Perhaps? Perhaps not. So what makes a story deep? I recommend that the morning story needs to face a series of challenges. The story teller is encouraged to go deeper through the following conduct. Food Insecurity in the United States is a growing public health program for people of all periods, but especially for aged grown-ups when the social environment of food “ access” if examined nearly. Some have argued that aged grown-ups with lower average inflows have advanced access to support, and thus further food security, but real access to healthy, fresh, affordable food involves not just eligibility for supplemental food support, but a much broader and more complex set of income, geographic, behavioral, and physical factors. When other income measures, beyond the standard Federal Poverty Level (FPL) are used to determine “poverty” rates among aged grown-ups in the U.S. the threat for food instability is easily advanced. Also, when other demographic factors (e.g. urbanization and growing ethnical diversity) are considered in our models of population aging, we see other factors arising that raise the threat for aged grown-ups in the U.S. In 2012, the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), estimated that 51 million Americans were facing the “trouble of hunger” and 6 million were over age 60. But, food Instability, as defined by AARP, includes not just obstacles to “ food input,” and a physical state of hunger (which isn't always reported), but also reduced “ access to food” and is therefore getting a more complex pattern frequently beyond the compass of being supplemental food programs. “Food instability” is snappily being honored as a major challenge not only for public health systems, but also for growing social services. In 2011, theU.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Economic Research Service (ERS), a program of the U.S. Census Bureau, estimated that14.9 of all homes in the U.S. had veritably-low food security for “ at least some time during the once time” and they defined “ veritably low food security” as a condition in which “ the food input of one or further ménage members was reduced and their eating patterns were disintegrated at times during the time because the ménage demanded plutocrat and other coffers for food”.

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