Journal of Aging and Geriatric MedicineISSN: 2576-3946

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Perspective, Agm Vol: 5 Issue: 8

Mild Cognitive Impairment is a Condition in Which a Person Experiences a Slight but Noticeable Decline in Mental Abilities Compared with others of the Same Age

Department of Biotechnology, Invertis University, Uttar Pradesh, India
*Corresponding author: Dr. Vijai Singh, Department of Biotechnology, Invertis University, Uttar Pradesh, India; Email: [email protected]
Received date: Aug 04, 2021; Accepted date: Aug 19, 2021; Published date: Aug 26, 2021

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment is a condition in which a person experiences a slight but noticeable decline in mental abilities compared with others of the same age. The minor decline in abilities is noticeable by the person experiencing them or by others who interact with the person, but the changes are not severe enough to interfere with normal daily life and activities. Some gradual mental decline is seen with normal aging. For example, the ability to learn new information may be reduced, mental processing slows, speed of performance slows, and ability to become distracted increases. However, these declines due to normal aging do not affect overall functioning or ability to perform activities of daily living.

Keywords: Mild Cognitive

Mild cognitive impairment is a condition in which a person experiences a slight but noticeable decline in mental abilities compared with others of the same age. The minor decline in abilities is noticeable by the person experiencing them or by others who interact with the person, but the changes are not severe enough to interfere with normal daily life and activities. Some gradual mental decline is seen with normal aging. For example, the ability to learn new information may be reduced, mental processing slows, speed of performance slows, and ability to become distracted increases. However, these declines due to normal aging do not affect overall functioning or ability to perform activities of daily living. Normal aging does not affect recognition, intelligence, or long-term memory. In normal aging, a person may occasionally forget names and words and misplace things. With mild cognitive impairment, the person frequently forgets conversations and information that one would ordinarily remember such as appointments and other planned events. Dementia is a general term used to describe a decline in mental function that is severe enough to interfere with daily living. Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a group of symptoms that can affect thinking, memory, reasoning, personality, mood and behavior. Dementia develops when the parts of the brain that are involved with learning, memory, decision-making, and language are affected by any of various infections or diseases. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer's disease. However, there are numerous other known causes of dementia, such as vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and dementia due to Parkinson’s disease and others. The condition of dementia is not a normal part of aging. One common misbelief about memory loss is that it always means a person has dementia. There are many causes of memory loss. Memory loss alone doesn’t necessarily confirm a diagnosis of dementia. It’s also true that some memory loss is normal as a person ages some neurons in the brain naturally die as we age. However, this type of memory loss is not disabling. There are some cases in which the cause of the mild cognitive impairment is due to the effects of a treatable illness or disease. However, researchers have now determined that for most patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), the MCI is a point along the pathway to dementia. The MCI is considered the stage between the mental changes that are seen in normal aging and earlystage dementia. MCI can be due to a variety of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, just as dementia can be due to a variety of reasons such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lowy bodies, vascular dementia, front temporal dementia, and other causes. Examples of memory and thinking problems that might be seen in someone with mild cognitive impairment include: Memory loss. Forgets recent events, repeats the same questions and the same stories, forgets the names of close friends and family members, forgets appointments or planned events, forgets conversations, misplaces items often. Language problems. Has trouble coming up with the desired words. Has difficulty understanding written or verbal spoken to information? Attention. Loses focus. Is easily distracted. Reasoning and judgment. Struggles with planning and problem solving. Has a hard time making decisions. Complex decision-making. May struggle, but can complete complex tasks such as paying bills, taking medications, shopping, cooking, household cleaning, driving. First, your doctor will perform a thorough medical history including asking about current and previous diseases and illnesses, current and previous medications, and family history of memory problems and dementia. He or she will also ask you and your close friend or family members if there have been noticeable changes in your ability to function in your usual day-to-day living and activities. Your doctor will also look for other causes of the symptoms of mild cognitive impairment see, “what causes mild cognitive impairment”. Ruling out other causes usually involves blood tests and possibly brain scans, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan.

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