Journal of Biodiversity Management & ForestryISSN: 2327-4417

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Research Article, J Biodivers Manage Forestry Vol: 2 Issue: 4

Relation of Forest Structure and Soil Properties in Natural, Rehabilitated and Degraded Forest

Ashish K Mishra1,2*, Soumit K Behera1, Kripal Singh1, Nayan Sahu1, Omesh Bajpai1, Anoop Kumar1, RM Mishra2, LB Chaudhary1 and Bajrang Singh1
1CSIR-National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001, Uttar Pradesh, India
2School of Environmental Biology, Awadesh Pratap Singh University, Rewa 486006, Madhya Pradesh, India
Corresponding author : Ashish K. Mishra
Plant Diversity, Systematics & Herbarium, CSIR-National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg 226001
Tel: +05222297960; Fax: +91 522 2205836, 2205832
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: July 31, 2013 Accepted: December 14, 2013 Published: December 18, 2013
Citation: Mishra AK, Behera SK, Singh K, Sahu N, Bajpai O, et al. (2013) Relation of Forest Structure and Soil Properties in Natural, Rehabilitated and Degraded Forest. J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2:4. doi:10.4172/2327-4417.1000117

Abstract

Relation of Forest Structure and Soil Properties in Natural, Rehabilitated and Degraded Forest

Plant community structure, species diversity and soil properties of natural, rehabilitated and degraded forests were studied in order to assess relationship of different forests structure and soil properties in upper Indo-Gangetic plain of Uttar Pradesh state of India. The composition of species, population bundance and importance value of the woody species were investigated in each forest; the representative soil samples from 30 cm depth of each forest were also analyzed for the soil properties. Dominant families at the natural forest are Moraceae (21.9%) and Rubiaceae (15.6%) while at the rehabilitated forest are Moraceae (53.8%) and Fabaceae (23%). In the degraded forest, the Moraceae and Fabaceae are dominant families occupy 33% each. These among forest community structure indicate that degraded forests are less complex ecosystems than natural forest stands.

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