Journal of Clinical & Experimental OncologyISSN: 2324-9110

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Review Article, J Clin Exp Oncol S Vol: 3 Issue: 0

Biophysics of Cancer: Cellular Excitability (“CELEX”) Hypothesis of Metastasis

Mustafa B A Djamgoz*
1Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
Corresponding author : Mustafa B A Djamgoz
Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 207 594 5370; Fax: +44 (0) 207 584 2056
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 12, 2013 Accepted: January 28, 2014 Published: February 05, 2014
Citation: Djamgoz MB (2014) Biophysics of Cancer: Cellular Excitability (“CELEX”) Hypothesis of Metastasis. J Clin Exp Oncol S1:005. doi:10.4172/2324-9110.S1-005

Abstract

Biophysics of Cancer: Cellular Excitability (“CELEX”) Hypothesis of Metastasis

This article advances a novel hypothesis of metastasis called “CELEX” (for cellular excitability) and presents the current evidence for it. The CELEX hypothesis is based upon concerted expression of voltage-gated ion, particularly Na+ and K+, channels during cancer progression. Electrophysiological recordings from human carcinoma cell lines have shown that, unlike weakly/nonmetastatic cells, cells that have strong metastatic potential express voltage-gated Na+ channels and much reduced outward, mainly K+ currents. Furthermore, the Na+ channel expression is selfsustaining by activity-dependent positive feedback. Thus, strongly metastatic carcinoma cells are excitable and, indeed, generate all-or-none type action potentials, despite their epithelial origin.

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