Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography ISSN: 2324-8661

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Editorial, J Mar Biol Oceanogr Vol: 1 Issue: 1

Contaminants of Concern in the Marine Environment: The Need for New Monitoring and Assessment Strategies

Geoffrey I. Scott1*, Michael H. Fulton1, Stephen B. Weisberg2, Keith A. Maruya2 and Gunnar Lauenstein3
1NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, Charleston, SC 29412, USA
2Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, 3535 Harbor Blvd. Suite 110, Costa Mesa, CA 92626, USA
3NOAA/NOS National Centers Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, 1305 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Corresponding author : Geoffrey I. Scott
NOAA/NOS NCCOS Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, Charleston, SC 29412, USA
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: June 27, 2012 Accepted: June 27, 2012 Published: June 29, 2012
Citation:Scott1 GI, Fulton1 MH, Weisberg SB, Maruya KA, Lauenstein G (2012) Contaminants of Concern in the Marine Environment: The Need for New Monitoring and Assessment Strategies. J Mar Biol Oceanogr 1:1. doi:10.4172/2324-8661.1000e102

Abstract

Contaminants of Concern in the Marine Environment: The Need for New Monitoring and Assessment Strategies

More than 156 million people, over half of the U.S. population, live in the coastal zone. These areas contribute $7.9 trillion to the U.S. economy. Economic development within the coastal zone may result in the discharge of chemical contaminants into coastal ecosystems from sewage treatment plants, industrial point sources and urban and agricultural nonpoint source runoff. Aquatic monitoring programs have long measured legacy contaminants such as DDT and PCBs, but are increasingly being asked to focus on modern commercial chemicals that as a group are referred to as Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs). CECs present many challenges, often because measurement methods don’t yet exist nor have toxicological studies yet been conducted to place monitoring results in proper context. This challenge is exacerbated because many CECs interact with hormone systems in wildlife to affect reproduction and development in ways that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations.

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