Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis ISSN: 2325-9590

Reach Us +1 850 754 6199
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Short Communication, J Vet Sci Med Diagn Vol: 2 Issue: 2

Detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum Leukotoxin (lkta) Gene Sequence in the Oral Cavity of Captive Macropods

John F Antiabong1,4*, Wayne Boardman2,3, Ian Smith2, Melissa H Brown1, Andrew S Ball1,4 and Amanda E Goodman1
1School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia 5042, Australia
2Zoos SA, Monarto Zoo, Princes Highway, Monarto, South Australia 5254, Australia
3School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, South Australia 5371, Australia
4School of Applied Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia
Corresponding author : John F Antiabong
School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia 5042, Australia
Tel: +61414125431;
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: July 02, 2013 Accepted: August 14, 2013 Published: August 19, 2013
Citation: Antiabong JF, Boardman W, Smith I, Brown MH, Ball AS, et al. (2013) Detection of Fusobacterium Necrophorum Leukotoxin (lkta) Gene Sequence in the Oral Cavity of Captive Macropods. J Vet Sci Med Diagn 2:2. doi:10.4172/2325-9590.1000114

Abstract

Detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum Leukotoxin (lkta) Gene Sequence in the Oral Cavity of Captive Macropods

Fusobacterium necrophorumis an important aetiological agent of periodontal diseases (gingivitis and lumpy jaw) in captive macropods. The leukotoxin encoded by the lktAgene is a major virulence factor of F. necrophorum. In the present study, lktA gene sequences were detected by PCR in the oral cavity of 21/58 (36%) captive yellow footed rock wallabies and mainland tammar wallabies at two zoological parks in South Australia. This suggest that F. necrophorum encoded lktAmay not be present in the oral cavity of all captive wallabies or that it is present at low levels, i.e. close to the limits of detection of conventional PCR.

Keywords: Fusobacterium necrophorum; Leukotoxin; Detection; Cluster analysis; PCR; Macropods

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page