Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis ISSN: 2325-9590

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Research Article, J Vet Sci Med Diagn Vol: 3 Issue: 2

Nasal Colonization of Staphylococcus Spp among Captive and Free-Ranging Wallabies in South Australia

Michelle MS Chen1*, Wayne SJ Boardman2,3, Ian Smith4, Amanda E Goodman1 and Melissa H Brown1
1School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park 5042, South Australia, Australia
2School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy 5371, South Australia, Australia
3Barbara Hardy Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095, South Australia, Australia
4ZoosSA, Monarto Zoo, Princes Highway, Monarto 5254, South Australia, Australia
Corresponding author : Michelle MS Chen
School of Biological Sciences, Sturt Road, Flinders University, Bedford Park 5042, South Australia, Australia
Tel: +61-8-8201 2215
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: March 14, 2014 Accepted: April 29, 2014 Published: May 05, 2014
Citation: Chen MM, Boardman WS, Smith I, Goodman AE, Brown MH (2014) Nasal Colonization of Staphylococcus Spp among Captive and Free-Ranging Wallabies in South Australia. J Vet Sci Med Diagn 3:2. doi:10.4172/2325-9590.1000136

Abstract

Nasal Colonization of Staphylococcus Spp among Captive and Free-Ranging Wallabies in South Australia

Staphylococcal species diversity has been well studied with regard to antibiotic resistance in humans and animals of commercial or social value. However, studies of free-ranging wildlife and animals of conservation value are limited. In this study, multidrug resistant staphylococci were found exclusively in free-ranging wallabies indicating human activity and prior antibiotic exposure may not be significant contributing factors to the development of antibiotic resistance in staphylococci in animal reservoirs.

Keywords: Staphylococcus; Wallaby; Commensal; Multidrug resistance; Wildlife; Macropod

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