Reach Us +1 850 900 2634

Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders & Treatment ISSN: 2324-8947

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Review Article, J Trauma Stress Disor Treat Vol: 4 Issue: 3

Beyond Trauma Treatment: Mindfulness Instruction in the Training Environment to Prevent Depression, Lower Suicide Rates and Improve Resilience in the Military and Veteran Communities

Kate Hendricks Thomas1* and Sarah Plummer Taylor2
1College of Health Sciences, Charleston Southern University, USA
2School of Social Work, University of Denver, USA
Corresponding author : Kate Hendricks Thomas
College of Health Sciences, Charleston Southern University, 9200 University Blvd, Charleston, SC 29410, USA
Tel: (843)863-7247
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: November 20, 2014 Accepted: April 03, 2015 Published: April 09, 2015
Citation: Thomas KH, Taylor SP (2015) Beyond Trauma Treatment: Mindfulness Instruction in the Training Environment to Prevent Depression, Lower Suicide Rates and Improve Resilience in the Military and Veteran Communities. J Trauma Stress Disor Treat 4:3. doi:10.4172/2324-8947.1000141

Abstract

Beyond Trauma Treatment:Mindfulness Instruction in the Training Environment to Prevent Depression, Lower Suicide Rates and Improve Resilience in the Military and Veteran Communities

The suicide numbers among active duty military personnel eclipsed the number of combat deaths in 2011. Before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the incidence of suicide in active duty US service members was consistently 25% lower than in the civilian population. While clinical health services exist for soldiers and Marines with existing mental health conditions like posttraumatic stress, they are not stemming the rising tide of service suicides. A new approach is required, one that speaks to the participatory, hardworking ethos of military culture. Social work and health promotion professionals working to prevent and treat mental health problems like depression and stress illness must understand the confluence of warrior culture and mental health issues in the veteran community. While the research literature does not yet address this confluence issue directly, it contains ample evidence to support the development of a culturally-informed mindfulness training protocol. This protocol would be best implemented in participatory fashion in the training environment, rather than in treatment settings. Veterans often reject patient identities, which creates a major barrier to care for mental health in this population. To combat suicide rates and promote military and veteran mental health, a new approach is required, one that embraces peer-education and speaks to a competitive individualist military culture. A research basis exists for mindfulnessbased training protocols grounded in resiliency theory, and focusing on pre-incident training rather than posttraumatic treatment can reduce stigma and save lives.

Keywords: Veterans; Depression; Mental health; Resilience; Mindfulness

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page