Journal of Spine & NeurosurgeryISSN: 2325-9701

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Case Report, J Spine Neurosurg Vol: 5 Issue: 3

Distant Multifocal Bony Metastasis of a Grade II Meningioma: Case Report

Halani SH1, Appin1,2, Brat DJ1,2,3 and Hadjipanayis CG1,2,3,4*
1Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
2Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
3Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, USA
4Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, USA
Corresponding author : Costas G
Hadjipanayis, Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Director of Neurosurgical Oncology, 10 Union Square East, Suite 5E, New York, NY 10003, USA
Tel: 212-844-6922
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: February 03, 2016 Accepted: April 02, 2016 Published: April 10, 2016
Citation:Halani SH, Appin C, Brat DJ, Hadjipanayis CG (2016) Distant Multifocal Bony Metastasis of a Grade II Meningioma: Case Report. J Spine Neurosurg 5:3. doi:10.4172/2325-9701.1000219

Abstract

Introduction Meningioma is the most frequent neoplasm of the central nervous system, accounting for nearly one-third of all intracranial tumors. The vast majority are benign and cured by surgical resection. Grade II meningiomas may show local invasion involving the brain, intracranial venous channels, bones, soft tissue and paranasal sinuses. Distant metastasis, on the other hand, is quite rare. Case Presentation We report distant, multifocal bony metastasis of an atypical meningioma, World Health Organization grade II, from a primary occipital lobe location in a patient who initially underwent stereotactic radiosurgery followed by surgical resection 4 years prior. The patient presented clinically with pain in the lower back and gluteal region. Distant metastases were noted radiologically in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and femur and were confirmed pathologically following biopsy. Conclusion Metastasis from meningiomas is exceedingly uncommon. In the present case, hematogenous spread to the lumbar spine, pelvis, and femur may have occurred due to a residual nodular remnant within the superior sagittal sinus.

Keywords: Meningioma; Atypical; WHO grade II; Bone metastasis

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