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Health Psychology: Eating and Stress Relations | SciTechnol

Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders & Treatment .ISSN: 2324-8947

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Perspective, J Trauma Stress Disor Treat Vol: 10 Issue: 6

Health Psychology: Eating and Stress Relations

Natasha Burke *

Department of Psychology, Fordham University, 441 East Fordham Road, Dealy Hall, Bronx, NY 10458, USA

Corresponding author: Natasha Burke *, Department of Psychology, Fordham University, East Fordham Road, Dealy Hall, Bronx, NY 10458, USA, Email: Natashb@ fordham.edu

Citation: Burke N (2021 Health Psychology: Eating and Stress Relations. J Trauma Stress Disor Treat 10:(6) 242.

Received: June 04, 2021 Accepted: June 18, 2021 Published: June 25, 2021

Keywords: Obesity, Food Addiction

Introduction

Food is necessary for human existence, but it also adds to mental development and prestige. As a result, food serves as a sedative, calming our emotions and regulating our interactions with others and the environment. The study's premise is based on the idea that food is necessary for our physical and mental growth as well as our habits. Individuals' emotional and physical responses to their physical environment and other people may be influenced by their eating habits. At the same time, a person's emotional state of mind will influence how they eat. According to the findings of a poll of 40 Saudi women, there is a strong link between eating habits and mental health. The purpose of this research is to investigate the link between eating habits and stress.

Literature Review

Nasser and colleagues conducted a study to see if long-term stress among first-year students at King Saudi University promotes changes in eating habits and cardiometabolism. A total of 120 students were surveyed, with 40 men and 80 women. According to the findings, 58.5 percent of men had unfavourable outcomes, whereas 60 percent of women had positive outcomes. Hormones are necessary for the body's functions to be coordinated. They are the chemicals that cause hunger, stress, and joy [1]. The type of hormones our bodies release to trigger a specific physiological function is determined by the state of our surroundings. When our appetite is sparked, it is mostly determined by our current interactions with people and our surroundings. The relation between stress and eating has been explained by a variety of hypotheses.

Hypotheses

There is a link between stress and eating. Food deprivation has an impact on how we react to others and our surroundings [2]. Stress will result if you skip a meal or two. Finally, when people are stressed, they tend to eat a lot of food.

Methodology

This research was carried out via an online survey, in which correspondents sent their responses to the researchers via email [3].In the United Arab Emirates, men put a lot of pressure on women. On a daily basis, they are exposed to emotional stress. A total of 40 women were questioned online for the survey. The questionnaire forms were sent to 40 women between the ages of 20 and 30. Only 20 people out of this group took part and returned the questionnaires through email.

Discussion

When people are stressed, they may have a tendency to overeat. This is why 50% of the people in the study agreed that when they are happy or worried, they eat more. When a person is depressed, he or she seeks out activities that will help them avoid the negative circumstances. Eating a lot of food could be one of these things.

Conclusion

The research is focused on the link between food intake and stress. According to the findings, there is a strong link between eating and stress. The way a person eats has a direct correlation with his or her mental condition. On the one hand, stress has an impact on a person's eating habits. Eating habits, on the other hand, may generate stress. When faced with a stressful situation, some people go without eating. They don't think about food because of their mental instability. When stressed, though, some people may eat excessively. This is dependent on how an individual deals with stress.

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