Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current ResearchISSN: 2324-903X

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Research Article, Analg Resusc Curr Res Vol: 2 Issue: 1

Prospective Study of Intrathecal Morphine versus Patient Controlled Analgesia in Cardiac Patients

Haris Bilal, Nnanyelu Nzeakor, Karim Morcos and Dumbor L Ngaage*
Lancashire Cardiac Centre, Blackpool Victoria Hospital, Whinney Heys Road, Blackpool, UK
Corresponding author : Dumbor L Ngaage
Essex Cardiothoracic Centre, Basildon University Hospital, Nethermayne Road, Basildon, Essex SS16 5NL, United Kingdom
Tel: 0845 1553111 Ext 4103
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E-mail: [email protected]
Received: March 02, 2013 Accepted: April 09, 2013 Published: April 15, 2013
Citation: Bilal H, Nzeakor N, Morcos K, Ngaage DL (2013) Prospective Study of Intrathecal Morphine versus Patient Controlled Analgesia in Cardiac Patients. Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2:1. doi:10.4172/2324-903X.1000103

Abstract

Prospective Study of Intrathecal Morphine versus Patient Controlled Analgesia in Cardiac Patients

Median sternotomy, the most common access used for cardiac surgery, is usually associated with severe early postoperative pain. Aggressive sternotomy pain control facilitates recovery, early mobilisation and decreases post-operative morbidity with  direct implications for clinical resource utilisation and cost. Strategies to achieve effective early postoperative pain control after cardiac surgery have been reported to include; the use of opioids delivered as intravenous infusion, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia, epidural infusion, epidural patient-controlled analgesia, single intrathecal bolus, and intermittent subcutaneous boluses. Local anaesthetic agents have been injected into the surgical site, or thoracic epidural space as boluses and/or infusion.

Keywords: Intrathecal morphine; Patient-controlled analgesia; Post-sternotomy pain; Haemodynamics; Cardiac surgery

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