Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current ResearchISSN: 2324-903X

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Research Article, Analg Resusc Curr Res S Vol: 2 Issue: 0

Sole Abdominal Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Novel Technique in the Management of Cardiac Arrest Following Cardiac Surgery

Haris Bilal R1, Zaman M2, Al-Lamee H3, Whitaker DK4, Hasan R5 and Vohra A4*
1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Wythenshawe Hospital, M23 9LT, UK
2Department of Orthopaedics, Stepping Hill Hospital, SK2 7JE, UK
3School of Medicine, University of Liverpool, L69 3GE, UK
4Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiothoracic surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL, UK
5Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL, UK
Corresponding author :Vohra A
Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL, UK
Tel: 0161-700-2929; Fax: 0161-423789
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: May 13, 2013 Accepted: June 04, 2013 Published: June 11, 2013
Citation: Haris Bilal R, Zaman M, Al-Lamee H, Whitaker DK, Hasan R, et al. (2013) Sole Abdominal Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Novel Technique in the Management of Cardiac Arrest Following Cardiac Surgery. Analg Resusc: Curr Res S1. doi:10.4172/2324-903X.S1-003

Abstract

Sole Abdominal Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Novel Technique in the Management of Cardiac Arrest Following Cardiac Surgery

 Augmentation of the effectiveness of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has taken many forms since the description of manual abdominal compression in 1967. Abdominal binding and a technique of interposed abdominal compression, used in tandem with chest compression, were described in the early 1980’s. Ralston and colleagues found a doubling of cardiac output with the use of abdominal counter-pulsation. On this basis Geddes and colleagues described the use of Sole Abdominal Compression in 2007. This is a bimanual technique that involves the compression of the abdomen in the central subcostal area, pushing 5cm downwards to compress the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava. In animal models, they have found it to be equal or superior to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR) in terms of coronary perfusion pressure and arterial pressure. However, it has not been described in clinical practice.

Keywords: Abdominal cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Abdominal compression; Cardiac arrest; Cardiac surgery

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