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Journal of Otology & Rhinology
Editor-in-Chief: Timothy M McCulloch, MD
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, USA
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ISSN: 2324-8785
Frequency: Bimonthly
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The Journal of Otology & Rhinology is a Hybrid Journal, giving author the choice of both Subscription based publication and Open Access.

JOR is a peer reviewed journal that accepts research, review articles, case reports, commentary, mini reviews, scientific reports, thesis and online letters to editor & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in the field of Otology, Rhinology and Otolaryngology. The journal aims to be the standard-bearer in otolaryngology research and surgery.

Aim and Scope: The Journal of Otology & Rhinology does not limit but emphasises on, Otology, Rhinology and Otolaryngology, ENT Infections and Treatments, Audiology, Head and Neck Surgery, Head and Neck Oncology, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Speech Therapy, Cochlear Implants and other medical treatments of ENT diseases and complications.

Journal of Otology & Rhinology will be focussing on Head and Neck Oncology for its upcoming issue. You are requested to mail us your manuscripts at editor.jor@scitechnol.com or SUBMIT ONLINE.

Articles submitted by authors are evaluated on Editorial Manager® System by a group of peer review experts in the field and it is ensured that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship, and the information they contain is accurate and reliable. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the system. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions and comments to the editor. Editors can manage the whole submission, review, revision and publishing process.

JOR also provides a range of options to purchase the subscription based scholarly research and review articles and also permits unlimited internet access to the complete journal content.

Journal of Otology & Rhinology is proudly associated with numerous renowned international societies and conferences in Otolaryngology and interdisciplinary fields such as 11th Annual Middle East Update in Otolaryngology Conference and Exhibition, Head and Neck Surgery, 4th Emirates Rhinology Otology Conference, 2nd and 3rd Bulgarian-Italian Meeting on Rhinology and Bulgarian Rhinologic Society.

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Current Issue
Editors & Editorial Board Members  
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3   
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Does the Method of Inferior Turbinate Surgery Affect the Development of Empty Nose Syndrome?   Commentary
Steven M. Houser
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000159
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Does the Method of Inferior Turbinate Surgery Affect the Development of Empty Nose Syndrome?

Empty Nose Syndrome (ENS) is a poorly understood iatrogenic syndrome that may follow surgery involving turbinate reduction. In the author’s experience, procedures which spare the mucosa are less likely to create ENS. Mucosal damage, rather than the sheer volume of tissue loss, appears to be of critical importance in ENS. Turbinate reduction is often appropriate therapy, but conservative mucosal sparing techniques should be employed.

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Single-sided Deafness with a Vestibular Schwannoma in the only Hearing Ear: Role of Cochlear Implantation   Research Article
Robert S Hong, Jack M Kartush, Aaron J Parkinson and Michael J LaRouere
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000157
 Preview

Single-sided Deafness with a Vestibular Schwannoma in the only Hearing Ear: Role of Cochlear Implantation

The treatment of a patient with a unilateral vestibular schwannoma often focuses on the side with the tumor, and justifiably so, as this is the patientís primary concern. However, on occasion, attention also needs to be paid to contralateral side, particularly when the patient has no hearing on that side. We present the case of an adult with profound sensorineural hearing loss in one ear and an intracanalicular tumor in the contralateral, normal-hearing ear, who received a cochlear implant in the deaf (non-tumor) ear. This patient allows for an examination of how best to treat singlesided deafness in the context of a tumor in an only-hearing ear. Rehabilitation options for single-sided deafness were prospectively explored, comparing the bone anchored hearing appliance (BAHA), contralateral routing of signals (CROS) hearing aid, and cochlear implant. Performance on sound localization, speech perception in noise, and a self-assessment of perceived hearing ability were measured. The results showed that cochlear implantation resulted in benefits for sound localization and perceived hearing ability, though effects on speech perception in noise were inconclusive. In conclusion, cochlear implantation is a reasonable treatment for acquired, single-sided deafness when observation is elected for a vestibular schwannoma in the contralateral, only-hearing ear. Implantation prior to development of bilateral deafness (should the tumor grow) allows the patient time to become adjusted to hearing with the implant. Furthermore, the addition of a cochlear implant may provide benefits for sound localization and speech perception in noise when combined with the normal-hearing ear.

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Flow Evaluation of the Internal Jugular Vein after Neck Dissection   Research Article
Erkan Vuralkan, Didem Sonbay, Isik Conkbayir, Cem Saka, Sibel Alicura Tokgoz, Istemihan Akin and Behcet Gunsoy
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000155
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Flow Evaluation of the Internal Jugular Vein after Neck Dissection

Objective: To evaluate thrombosis, flow rate and changes in the caliber of the internal jugular vein after neck dissection.

Methods: Sixteen patients who underwent twenty-two internal jugular vein sparing neck dissections December 2008 to September 2009 were evaluated. Pre- and postoperatively, the patency of internal jugular veins was determined by duplex Doppler ultrasound examination. The patients were scanned in the supine position, and the patency and caliber of the internal jugular veins were assessed. These examinations were performed preoperatively and at the 1st and 3rd postoperative months.

Results: There were significant differences in the caliber and flow rate of the internal jugular veins as detected in preoperative and 7-day postoperative evaluations (p<0.05). No significant differences in the caliber and flow rate of the internal jugular veins were observed in the preoperative and 1-month postoperative evaluations (p>0.05). The caliber and flow rate of the internal jugular veins were determined to be within the normal range at the 3-month postoperative evaluation. Thrombus was not found in any patient postoperatively.

Conclusion: Decreased flow rate improved gradually in neck dissections that preserved the internal jugular vein. The protection of the internal jugular vein will minimize morbidity.

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Central Papillary Cystadenocarcinoma of the Mandible: A Case Report   Case Report
Chonticha Srivanitchapoom, Pichit Sittitrai and Pongsak Mahanupab
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000156
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Papillary cystadenocarcinoma; Intraosseous tumor; Salivary gland neoplasm

Background: Central papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the jaw is an extremely rare tumor with only three previously reported cases in the English literature. This tumor is a histologically low-grade cancer, affecting only the mandible.

Methods: A 65-year-old woman presented with a two months history of a rapidly growing, painless mass of the right ascending ramus of the mandible. The patholologic report from incisional biopsy was a papillary cystic tumor with a differential diagnosis of cystadenoma versus cystadenocarcinoma.

Results: Segmental mandibulectomy, parotidectomy and submandibular gland resection were performed. The final pathology was intraosseous papillary cystadenocarcinoma.

Conclusions: Clinical features of central papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the mandible mimic an odontogenic lesion and metastatic bone disease, careful review of radiograph and pathology should be done. En bloc resection with adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy in high stage disease, and long-term follow-up allow the patient to have a favourable prognosis.

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Spontaneous Size Regression of a Vestibular Schwannoma   Case Report
Nicholas J Scalzitti and Travis J Pfannenstiel
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000155
 Preview

Spontaneous Size Regression of a Vestibular Schwannoma

Vestibular schwannomas are the most commonly occurring skull base tumors. Increasing availability of magnetic resonance imaging has allowed early recognition of these tumors and better characterization of their natural course. Recently, several series have presented data with regard to the slow growth of these tumors and challenged the need for tumor resection or radiation in cases involving small to medium-sized tumors. This is a case report of spontaneous regression of a medium-sized vestibular schwannoma occurring after initial slow tumor growth.

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Laryngeal Cancer in a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis   Case Report
Shintaro Yoshihara, Takahiro Asakage, Yuki Saito, Takaharu Nito, Jun Shimizu, Shoji Tsuji and Tatsuya Yamasoba
J Otol Rhinol 2014, 3:3    doi: 10.4172/2324-8785.1000154
 Preview

Laryngeal Cancer in a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

We present the case of a 75-year-old male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who developed laryngeal cancer. He was diagnosed as having ALS with progressive bulbar symptoms at the age of 67, and underwent glottis closure and tracheostomy at the age of 71 to prevent aspiration. At the time, he could only move his eyes and toes and was totally dependent on a mechanical ventilator. At the age of 75, he showed swelling and redness around the tracheostoma and was diagnosed as having laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, T4aN0M0. Total laryngectomy was performed with skin reconstruction using a delto-pectoral flap. Because of the recent improvement in the prognosis of ALS, it is important to consider appropriate treatment strategies for ALS patients with other fatal complications or diseases based on their will and quality of life.

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