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JWHIC now associated with
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care
Editorial Board: Natalie L. Rasgon, MD
 Stanford University, USA  view all
ISSN: 2325-9795
Frequency: Bimonthly
 
The Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care (JWHIC) promotes rigorous research that makes a significant contribution in advancing knowledge for women health issues. JWHIC includes all major themes pertaining to women’s health.
 
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care is a subscription based journal that provides a range of options to purchase our articles and also permits unlimited Internet Access to complete Journal content. It accepts research, review papers, online letters to the editors & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in SciTechnol. Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer review experts in the field and ensures that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship in their fields, and that the information they contain is accurate and reliable.
 
Current Issue
When Patients Request the Knife – Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request   Case Report
Christopher M Tarney
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000130
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When Patients Request the Knife – Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request

Cesarean delivery on maternal request is defined as a prelabor cesarean delivery on maternal request in the absence of any maternal or fetal indications. There are many reasons underlying why women may desire this type of delivery versus planned vaginal delivery: anxiety over the birthing process, concern for perineal trauma during vaginal delivery, potential for urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse, or the desire of selecting the date of delivery..

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Breast Cancer Survivorship – Optimizing Follow-up Care: Patients’ Perspectives of their Practical Needs   Research Article
Savitri Singh-Carlson and Cindy Gotz
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000131
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Breast Cancer Survivorship – Optimizing Follow-up Care: Patients’ Perspectives of their Practical Needs

Breast cancer is still recognized as the most common cancer among American women with 1 in 8 women (12%) who will develop invasive breast cancer and about 39,510 women who will die from breast cancer, with 23,644 expected cases for California in 2013. Although breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer, death rates from breast cancer have rapidly declined since 1990, with larger decreases in women younger than fifty due to earlier detection, surveillance, increased awareness and improved treatment, resulting in more than 2.9 million breast cancer survivors (BCS) in the United States.

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Determinants of Umbilical Cord Prolapse in a Low-Resource Setting   Research Article
Eleje George Uchenna, Ofojebe Chukwuemeka Jude, Udegbunam Onyebuchi I and Adichie Chuma Victor
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000132
 Preview

Determinants of Umbilical Cord Prolapse in a Low-Resource Setting

Umbilical Cord prolapse is an infrequent and life-threatening obstetric emergency in which blood flow through the umbilical cord ceases due to an acute compression between the fetus and the uterus, cervix, or pelvic inlet. It differs from cord presentation in which the cord is below the presenting part but with the fetal membranes intact.

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Childcare Responsibilities and Women’s Medical Care   Research Article
Jason R Woloski, Candace Robertson-James, Serita Reels and Ana Núñez1
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000133
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Childcare Responsibilities and Women’s Medical Care

Caring for children requires an ongoing commitment to their provision, growth and development, which may require balancing multiple demands and a personal sacrifice at times. While both men and women are impacted by childcare responsibilities, women are often viewed as the primary managers of their children’s care and, in general, spend as much as 50% more time providing care than their male counterparts.

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Anemia: A Brief Overview Regards the Pregnant State   Review Article
Surabhi Chandra and Anil Kumar Tripathi
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000134
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Anemia: A Brief Overview Regards the Pregnant State

Anemia in pregnancy has been a long talked about problem. In India, anemia is the second most common cause of maternal mortality, affecting around 84% of pregnant women and accounting for about 20% of the total maternal deaths. Despite massive efforts, it continues to be a major cause of morbidity as well, especially in pregnant females, which in turn bears consequences on the physical and mental development of the fetus and the pregnancy outcome.

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Preconception Care: Prevalence of Chronic Disease   Research Article
Min-Young Lee, Hyun-Mee Ryu, Moon-Young Kim, Hyun-Kyeong Ahn, June-Seek Choi, Min-Hyoung Kim, Jin-Hoon Chung, Si-Won Lee, You-Jung Han, Dong-Wook Kwak and Jung-Yeol Han
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000135
 Preview

Preconception Care: Prevalence of Chronic Disease

All women of childbearing age hope that their children will be born healthy when they become pregnant. To have a healthy baby and be a healthy mother are universally valued goals. If women want to give birth to a healthy baby, the health of the mother should be the initial priority; this idea forms the basis of preconception care.

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Cervical Cancer Screening in the Developing World and the Challenge of Caring for Women with Cancer   Short Communication
Annekathryn Goodman, Marcela del Carmen and Linus Chuang
J Womens Health, Issues Care 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2325-9795.1000136
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Cervical Cancer Screening in the Developing World and the Challenge of Caring for Women with Cancer

Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Low cost screening programs have been developed. Currently cancer treatment services are inadequate and the majority of women diagnosed with cervical cancer will die from their cancer in LMICs. Current challenges to cancer care are reviewed.

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