Journal of Otology & RhinologyISSN: 2324-8785

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Case Report, J Otol Rhinol Vol: 3 Issue: 2

Management of Congenital Oral or Oropharyngeal Masses Resulting in Cleft Palate

Laura H. Swibel Rosenthal1, Amelia F. Drake2, Paula J. Harmon3, Bruce Bell Jr.4, Anahita Jalilvand5* and Carlton J. Zdanski2
1Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Pediatrics, Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA
2Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
3Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Children’s Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA
4Department of Radiology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
5Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA
Corresponding author : Anahita Jalilvand
324 S. Grant, Hinsdale, IL, 60521, USA
Tel: 630- 401-5938; Fax: 708-216-4834
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: January 12, 2014 Accepted: March 13, 2014 Published: March 23, 2014
Citation: Rosenthal LS, Drake AF, Harmon PJ, Bell Jr. B, Jalilvand A, et al. (2014) Management of Congenital Oral or Oropharyngeal Masses Resulting in Cleft Palate. J Otol Rhinol 3:2. doi:10.4172/2324-8785.1000153

Abstract

Management of Congenital Oral or Oropharyngeal Masses Resulting in Cleft Palate

This is a case series of five patients with congenital oral or pharyngeal masses associated with a cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency. The study included all patients at a single tertiary care institution between July 2009 and July 2010; however, the initial neonatal diagnoses were made between 3 and 25 years ago. These cases are examined to gain an understanding of prognosis and the role of the otolaryngologist for these patients, the scope of which ranged from initial airway management and excision of the mass to reconstruction of the pharynx and rehabilitation of speech and swallow. All patients had a hamartoma or teratoma. With treatment, all patients had a stable airway and tolerated an oral diet. Speech outcomes were dependent on the deformity and cognitive development of the patient. Additional surgeries were often performed for associated comorbidities, such as otitis media and malocclusion.

Keywords: Congenital mass; Pharyngeal mass; Cleft palate; Velopharyngeal insufficiency; Otolaryngology

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