International Journal of Mental Health & PsychiatryISSN: 2471-4372

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Editorial,  Int J Ment Health Psychiatry Vol: 7 Issue: 5

Suicide in Children’s and Teens

Lifeng Zhang*

Department of Nursing, Sun Yat-sen University, Yuexiu District, Guangdong Province, China

*Corresponding author: Zhang L, Department of Nursing, Sun Yat-sen University, Yuexiu District, Guangdong Province, China. E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: October 03, 2021; Accepted Date: October 16, 2021; Published Date: October 23, 2021.

Citation: Lifeng Zhang (2021) Suicide in Children’s and Teens. Int J Ment Health Psychiatry 7:5.

Abstract

Every year, 703 000 individuals commit suicide, with many more attempting to commit suicide. Every suicide is a tragedy that impacts entire families, towns, and countries, as well as the people who are left behind. Suicide affects people of all ages and was the world's fourth biggest cause of mortality among 15-29 year-olds in 2019. Suicide is a global problem that occurs in all regions of the world, not just in highincome countries. In fact, in 2019, low- and middle-income nations accounted for more than 77 percent of global suicides.

Keywords: Suicide

Introduction

Every year, 703 000 individuals commit suicide, with many more attempting to commit suicide. Every suicide is a tragedy that impacts entire families, towns, and countries, as well as the people who are left behind. Suicide affects people of all ages and was the world's fourth biggest cause of mortality among 15-29 year-olds in 2019. Suicide is a global problem that occurs in all regions of the world, not just in highincome countries. In fact, in 2019, low- and middle-income nations accounted for more than 77 percent of global suicides.

Suicide is a severe public health issue, but it can be avoided with timely, evidence-based, and frequently low-cost treatments. A comprehensive multispectral suicide prevention strategy is required for effective national responses. While the link between suicide and mental disorders (particularly depression and alcoholism) is well established in high-income countries, many suicides occur impulsively in times of crisis, as a result of a breakdown in one's ability to cope with life stresses such as financial difficulties, relationship breakups, or chronic pain and illness. Suicidal behavior is also closely linked to conflict, tragedy, violence, abuse, or loss, as well as a sense of solitude. Suicide rates are also high among discriminated-against groups, such as refugees and migrants, indigenous peoples, lesbian, homosexual, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people, and convicts. A previous suicide attempt is by far the most powerful risk factor for suicide.

It is estimated that around 20% of global suicides are due to pesticide self-poisoning, most of which occur in rural agricultural areas in low- and middle-income countries. Other common methods of suicide are hanging and firearms. Knowledge of the most commonly used suicide methods is important to devise prevention strategies that have shown to be effective, such as restriction of access to means of suicide. Suicides are preventable. There are a number of measures that can be taken at population, sub-population and individual levels to prevent suicide and suicide attempts. LIVE LIFE, WHO’s approach to suicide prevention, recommends the following key effective evidencebased interventions. Suicide prevention efforts require coordination and collaboration among multiple sectors of society, including the health sector and other sectors such as education, labour, agriculture, business, justice, law, defence, politics, and the media. These efforts must be comprehensive and integrated as no single approach alone can make an impact on an issue as complex as suicide.

Track Your Manuscript