International Journal of Mental Health & PsychiatryISSN: 2471-4372

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Research Article, Int J Ment Health Psychiatry Vol: 2 Issue: 1

Trajectories from Childhood to Suicide: The Role of Childhood Adversity and Psychopathology

Marie Robert1*, Guy Beauchamp1 and Monique Séguin1,2
1Department of Psychoeduction and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, C.P. 1250, succ., Hull, Gatineau (QC), Canada
2McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Mental, Health University Institute, Montreal (QC), Canada
Corresponding author : Marie Robert
Departement of Psychoeduction and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, C.P. 1250, succ., Hull, Gatineau (QC), Canada, J8X 3X7
Tel: +1 819-595-3900
Fax: +1 819-595-2250
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: November 07, 2015 Accepted: February 06, 2016 Published: February 10, 2016
Citation: Robert M, Beauchamp G, Séguin M (2016) Trajectories from Childhood to Suicide: The Role of Childhood Adversity and Psychopathology. Int J Ment Health Psychiatry 2:1. doi:10.4172/2471-4372.1000115

Abstract

Objective: With a life course perspective, we have identified the diverse pathways in which cumulative adversity in childhood and adolescence lead to detrimental outcomes: psychopathology and suicide. This study's design allowed us to address some major, controversial developmental issues surrounding the contribution of multiple forms of adversity (victimization events versus non-victimization events) to negative outcomes, specifically mental health disorders and suicide.

Method: We combined three statistical analyses: discrete time survival (DTS), latent class growth analysis (LCGA) and path analysis to identify the sequence of events and conditions that contribute to the development of psychopathology and suicide.

Results: Our results show that the process implicates early childhood adversities that act in a cascading manner and are cumulative in two ways: quantitatively and qualitatively. Therefore, pathways with more severe adverse experiences in childhood (victimization such as abuse or neglect) or with a greater number of adversity events (non-victimization) both tend to produce mental health problems and suicidal behavior early in life, contrary to pathways with fewer or less severe adversities.

Keywords: Developmental approach; Life course; Childhood adversity; Cumulative model of disadvantage; Victimization

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