Journal of Otology & RhinologyISSN: 2324-8785

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Research Article, J Otol Rhinol Vol: 2 Issue: 2

Self-reported Improvement with Voice Therapy via Translation for Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Pilot Study

Daniel J Stein1, Hadas Golan2, Seth M Cohen3 and J Pieter Noordzij1,2*
1Boston University School of Medicine, USA
2Boston Medical Center, USA
3Duke University School of Medicine, USA
Corresponding author : Pieter Noordzij, MD
4th Floor, FGH Building, 820 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118, USA
Tel: 617-638-7933
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: February 01, 2013 Accepted: May 10, 2013 Published: May 15, 2013
Citation: Stein DJ, Golan H, Cohen SM, Noordzij JP (2013) Self-reported Improvement with Voice Therapy via Translation for Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Pilot Study. J Otol Rhinol 2:2. doi:10.4172/2324-8785.1000119

Abstract

Self-reported Improvement with Voice Therapy via Translation for Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Pilot Study

Purpose: Voice therapy is essential to caring for millions of Americans with vocal problems. However, for immigrants who are non-English speakers (NES), native-language therapists may not be available. Treatment is often provided via translator, but little data support the efficacy of this modality. We hypothesized that voice therapy would improve subject self-ratings of voice impairment, both with and without translation.

Materials/Methods: We surveyed both NES and English-speakers (ES) before and two months after receiving voice therapy at our institution for functional dysphonia. NES received therapy via translation. The survey instrument was the 30-item Voice Handicap Index (VHI). NES subjects were provided with a professionally translated version of the VHI in their native language.

Results: Change scores were calculated for the 20 subjects (12 NES and 7 ES) who completed both pre- and post-treatment surveys, and were normalized to a maximal score of 120 to account for incomplete questionnaires. ES improved from a baseline mean of 49.1 to 30.5 (p=0.015), and NES from 56.9 to 47.3 (p=0.065). The mean for the entire group improved from 54.0 to 41.1 (p=0.002). No significant between-group difference was found.

Conclusion: Overall, this mixed population showed improvement in the VHI with voice therapy. Analyzed individually, English-speakers had significant improvement, while non-English speakers did not. Further studies of voice therapy via translation are warranted.

Keywords: Voice therapy; Voice handicap index; Translation; Muscle tension dysphonia; Functional dysphonia

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