Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

Reach Us +18507546199
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Research Article, J Athl Enhancement Vol: 2 Issue: 4

The Effects of Motivational Self-Talk on Self-Efficacy and Performance in Novice Undergraduate Students

Nikos Zourbanos*, Stiliani Chroni, Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis and Yannis Theodorakis
Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, Greece
Corresponding author : Nikos Zourbanos
Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, Karies, GR 42100, Trikala, Greece
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: November 13, 2012 Accepted: July 20, 2013 Published: July 26, 2013
Citation: Zourbanos N, Chroni S, Hatzigeorgiadis A, Theodorakis Y (2013) The Effects of Motivational Self-Talk on Self-Efficacy and Performance in Novice Undergraduate Students. J Athl Enhancement 2:3. doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000117

Abstract

The Effects of Motivational Self-Talk on Self-Efficacy and Performance in Novice Undergraduate Students

The study of self-talk in sport has provided evidence on a few of the effects of self-talk on task performance. However, one of the issues which remains unclear in the self-talk literature is the matching of task’s motor demands with the different types of self-talk cues, the so called matching hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of motivational self-talk on students’ selfefficacy levels and on their performance in a precision-oriented task. Forty-four (Mage = 20.93, SD = 2.31) physical education undergraduate students with no experience in dart throwing (22 females and 22 males) were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group that used motivational self-talk and the control group. A baseline and two performance trials were performed. Mixed model ANOVAs revealed group by time interaction for selfefficacy (p<0.05). Post-hoc analysis showed that self-efficacy in the motivational self-talk group increased significantly (p<0.001), whereas the self-efficacy of the control group had no significant changes. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in the performance scores between the experimental and the control group. The fact that only self-efficacy levels changed over time, whereas the performance levels didn’t, is discussed based on thecontradictory findings of the matching hypothesis.

Keywords: Cognitive strategies; Functions of self-talk; Physical education; Matching hypothesis

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page