Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

Reach Us +44 7482 874137
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Research Article, J Athl Enhancement Vol: 3 Issue: 3

"I Can Do It" Versus "We Can Do It": Effects of Different References of Motivational Self-Talk on Pre-Competition Anxiety

Veronica Son1*, Evelyn Oregon2 and Deborah L. Feltz3
1Division of Kinesiology and Sport Science, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, USA
3Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA
Corresponding author : Veronica Son
Division of Kinesiology and Sport Science, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, 57069, USA
Tel: +1 605 677 5937; Fax: +1 605 677 5338
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: November 01, 2013 Accepted: April 15, 2014 Published: April 21, 2014
Citation: Son V, Oregon E, Feltz DL (2014) "I Can Do It" Versus "We Can Do It":Effects of Different References of Motivational Self-Talk on Pre-Competition Anxiety. J Athl Enhancement 3:3. doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000150

Abstract

"I Can Do It" Versus "We Can Do It": Effects of Different References of Motivational Self-Talk on Pre-Competition Anxiety

The purpose of this study was to examine how modifying the referent of self-talk statements with respect to level of agency (i.e., individual versus group) may influence team members’ self-confidence and performance anxiety within a team-based novel dart-throwing task. In addition, this investigation sought to explore the way in which one’s relative performance within the team (i.e., superior performer versus inferior performer) may influence the effect of self-talk on performance anxiety. Collegiate undergraduate participants (N=93) were randomly assigned to three-person teams and then were allocated to one of three self-talk conditions, specifically (a) selftalk statements that focused upon one’s personal capabilities, (b) self-talk statements emphasizing the group’s capabilities, or (c) irrelevant self-talk. Based on their practice performance, students were ranked as a superior or inferior performer within a team. Only the top ranked and bottom ranked members of the triad were used in analysis. Results showed that inferior team members reported lower somatic anxiety when group-oriented self-talk was used, compared to when individual-oriented self-talk was used. For superior performers within a team, however, somatic anxiety was higher when they used group-oriented self-talk than when individualoriented self-talk was implemented. Regarding self-confidence, no significant effect of self-talk was found. These findings are considered with respect to their novel theoretical contribution to the anxiety literature in a group setting and their practical implications for decreasing pre-competition anxiety.

Keywords: Group performance; Pre-competition anxiety; Self-confidence; Selftalk

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page