Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Editorial, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 0 Issue: 0

A Neurosurgeon's Guide to Sports Related Head Injury

Catherine Sabistona*

University of Wollongong, Department of Psychology, Northfields Ave, Australia

*Corresponding author: Catherine Sabistona, University of Wollongong, Department of Psychology, Northfields Ave, Australia, Tel: +613552659276; Email: [email protected]

Received date: 07 July, 2021; Accepted date: 21 July, 2021; Published date: 28 July, 2021

Keywords: Sport Performance Enhancement, Sport Psychology, Sports, Sports Doping, Strength

Introduction

A definition of concussion is difficult due to the shortage of objective clinical and radiographic findings. There are usually no findings on routine imaging, like Computerized Tomography (CT), which makes the definition of concussion less clear than definitions of other sorts of brain injury. Definitions are offered by the department of defense, as have consensus statements from the concussion in sport group from Vienna and Prague. The foremost recent and agreed-on definition of concussion is that began within the Zurich consensus statement, which refined the Vienna and Prague definitions. The Zurich statement defines concussion as “A Complex Pathophysiological Process Affecting the Brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces.” This definition doesn't require loss of consciousness to diagnose concussion. Other features frequently present in concussion are a quick period of amnesia and anterograde amnesia. For practical purposes, the Cantu Grading Scale has been helpful in assessing severity of concussion and for creating return-toplay decisions. Grade 1 includes anterograde amnesia but half-hour and no loss of consciousness. Grade 2 is defined as loss of consciousness but 5 minutes or amnesia half-hour to 24 hours, and grade 3 includes loss of consciousness greater than 5 minutes or amnesia greater than 24 hours

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