Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 6 Issue: 2

A Screening Test to Determine Shoulder Stability in Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players: A Feasibility Study

Timothy P Rowland*, Jane M Butler and Kimberley A Cochrane
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Australia
Corresponding author : Timothy Rowland
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Level 9, 33 Berry Street, North Sydney, NSW 2060, Australia
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: February 01, 2017 Accepted: February 16, 2017 Published: February 21, 2017
Citation: Rowland TP, Butler JM, Cochrane KA (2017) A Screening Test to Determine Shoulder Stability in Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players: A Feasibility Study. J Athl Enhanc 6:2.doi: 10.4172/2324-9080.1000252

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a shoulder screening test to predict shoulder stability in adolescent rugby union players.

Design: A feasibility study.

Methods: Adolescent male rugby union players (n=27) aged 12-18 years were recruited from secondary schools in metropolitan Sydney. Measures of shoulder strength, active joint range of movement and joint hypermobility were recorded.

Results: The right shoulder was significantly stronger than the left in extension (mean difference=2.63; t27=-3.38; p=0.002, two-tailed), abduction (mean difference=2.24; t27=-2.42; p=0.023, two-tailed), and internal rotation in neutral (mean difference=1.36; t27=-2.82; p=0.009, two-tailed). No significant differences in strength were found between sides for shoulder flexion and external rotation in neutral. Internal rotation strength was significantly greater in neutral than in 90o abduction but contrary results were found for external rotation. No significant relationship was found between shoulder muscle strength and active shoulder joint range of movement (r=0.05, p=0.81). No significant differences were found between left and right sides for active range of movement. Four participants (14.8%) scored above normal (>4/9) on the Beighton’s Hypermobility Score. There was a moderate, positive correlation between body mass index and average shoulder muscle strength (r=0.40, p=0.04).

Conclusion: The protocol used in this study was feasible for both participants and examiners. This screening test could be used to identify potential risk factors for shoulder injury.

Keywords: Shoulder; Risk factors; Rugby; Adolescent; Injury; Joint instability

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