Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 8 Issue: 1

Effects of a Six-Week Strength and Power Training Program on Punching and Kicking Impact Power in Amateur Male Combat Athletes: A Pilot Study

Del Vecchio L1*, Stanton R2,5,6, Campbell Macgregor2,4, Brendan Humphries2 and Nattai Borges3

1School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, Australia

2School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia

3School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia

4School of Applied Sciences, Toi Ohoma Institute of Technology, Tauranga, New Zealand

5Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia

6Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, Wayville, Australia

*Corresponding Author : Luke Del Vecchio
School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Tel:
+07 5589 3202
E-mail:
[email protected]

Received: April 08, 2019Accepted: May 09, 2019Published: May 27, 2019

Citation: Del Vecchio L, Stanton R, Macgregor C, Humphries B, Borges N (2019) Effects of a Six-Week Strength and Power Training Program on Punching and Kicking Impact Power in Amateur Male Combat Athletes: A Pilot Study. J Athl Enhanc 8:1. doi: 10.4172/2324-9080.1000315

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of a six-week strength and power training program, on striking impact power in amateur male combat athletes. A convenience sample of 16 amateur male combat athletes with at least two years combat training experience were assigned to either a strength and power training program (SPT, n=10) or control group (CT, n=6). Both groups performed three weekly combat training sessions for six weeks. The SPT group performed two sixty-minute SPT sessions in addition to usual combat training. The following variables: leadhand jab, rear-hand cross, front kick and roundhouse kick mean impact power, vertical jump height, and five-repetition maximum (5RM) half-squat and bench press, were measured using standard protocols at baseline and after six weeks. Magnitude-based inferences (Cohen’s d (d) ± 90% CI) revealed likely beneficial effects of SPT on cross punch (d=0.69 ±0.76), roundhouse kick power (d=0.86 ± 0.83), and vertical jump (d=0.53 ± 0.66). Benefits of usual combat training were unclear for all measured parameters. When between-group changes across the six-week period were compared SPT demonstrated likely benefits for cross-punch (d=0.75 ± 0.80) and 5RM half-squat (d=0.81 ±0.78) compared to usual combat training. These data suggest the addition of SPT to combat training may have a beneficial effect on cross-punch impact power and 5RM half-squat strength in amateur male combat athletes.

Keywords: Power training; Punching; Kicking; Athletes

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