Journal of Athletic Enhancement.ISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 9 Issue: 4

Harness Resistance Training: Does it Improve Jump and Enzymatic-Mechanical Muscle Performance in Young Soccer Players?

Gutiérrez-Vargas JC1, Cruz-Fuentes I1, Sánchez-Ureña B2, Esquivel-Rodríguez MJ2, Gutiérrez-Vargas R3, Salas-Cabrera J2 and Rojas-Valverde D3,4,*

1Centro para el Desarrollo y Rehabilitación en Salud (CEDERSA), Escuela Ciencias del Movimiento Humano y Calidad de Vida, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica

2Programa de Ciencias del Ejercicio y la Salud (PROCESA), Escuela Ciencias del Movimiento Humano y Calidad de Vida, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica

3Centro de Investigación y Diagnóstico en Salud y Deporte (CIDISAD), Escuela Ciencias del Movimiento Humano y Calidad de Vida, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica

4Grupo en Entrenamiento Deportivo y Acondicionamiento Físico (GAEDAF), Facultad Ciencias del Deporte, Universidad de Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain

*Corresponding Author: Johan Kling
Bethel University Human Kinetics & Applied Health Science department, USA
Tel: +1 6124427595
Email: [email protected]

Received: May 26, 2020 Accepted: June 23, 2020 Published: June 30, 2020

Citation: Gutiérrez-Vargas JC, Cruz-Fuentes I, Sánchez-Ureña B, Esquivel-Rodríguez MJ, Gutiérrez-Vargas R, et al. (2020) Harness Resistance Training: Does it Improve Jump and Enzymatic-Mechanical Muscle Performance in Young Soccer Players? J Athl Enhanc 9:4.

Abstract

Background: Harness resistance training have been usedextensively by coaches and trainers in different sport, but iteffectiveness have to be proved.
Objective: Aim of this study was to explore the effects of an assisted harness resistance training program on vertical jump associated with squat and counter-movement jumps, biochemical fatigue markers (magnesium [Mg2+], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH],and creatine phosphokinase [CPK]), muscle displacement [Dm] and
contraction time [Tc]) in the lower limbs of young soccer players.
Methods: Eighteen young soccer players (age: 17.89 ± 0.98 years; height: 1.74 ± 0.07 m; body weight: 67.84 ± 7.26 kg; body fat percentage 12.02% ± 3.95%) were randomly assigned to three training groups: control, harness-assisted, and puller groups (three sessions per week for 8 weeks). Statistical significance was set at p< 0.05 for analysis of variances.
Results: No significant differences among the three groups in vertical jump regarding the squat jump (p=0.43) and countermovement jump (p=0.92); the biochemical fatigue markers CPK (p=0.38), LDH (p=0.51), or Mg2+ (p=0.79); or right rectus femoris (Tc: p=0.88; Dm: p=0.91), left rectus femoris (Tc: p=0.91; Dm: p=0.17),
right biceps femoris (Tc: p=0.20; Dm: p=0.06), left biceps femoris Tc: p= 0.17; Dm: p=0.63), right gastrocnemius lateralis (Tc: p=0.64; Dm: p=0.66), or left gastrocnemius lateralis (Tc: p=0.64; Dm: p=0.64).
Conclusion: The application of this kind of assisted sports training does not seem to effectively improve muscular power or enzymatic and muscle responses.

Keywords: Tensiomyography; Biochemical responses; Athletic training

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