Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 6 Issue: 1

Muscular and Metabolic Responses to Resistance-Training with Eccentric Overload

Bernardo Neme Ide1,3*, Thiago Fernando Lourenço1, René Brenzikofer1,2 and Denise Vaz Macedo1
1Department of Biochemistry Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry, Biology Institute, State University of Campinas, SP, Brazil
2Department of Sport Science, State University of Campinas, SP, Brazil
3Faculty of Physical Education Metropolitan College of Campinas, Devry Group, SP, Brazil
Corresponding author : Bernardo Neme Ide
Department of Biochemistry, Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry, Biology Institute, State University of Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil
Tel: +55 19 3521 6148
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: December 23, 2016 Accepted: January 17, 2017 Published: January 21, 2017
Citation:Ide BN, Lourenço TF, Brenzikofer R, Macedo DV (2017) Muscular and Metabolic Responses to Resistance-Training with Eccentric Overload. J Athl Enhanc 6:1. doi: 10.4172/2324-9080.1000248

Abstract

Objective: The main aim of the study was to observe the responses to a resistance-training program with an eccentric overload (EO) on muscular and metabolic parameters determinants for endurance
training performance.

Methods: Eight physically active subjects (3 women - age: 23.8 ±2.6 years; body mass: 70.9 ± 12.7 kg; height: 1.6 ± 0.08 m; % body fat: 29.6 ± 4.3; and 5 men - age: 23.8 ± 2.6 years; body mass: 75.1
± 11.2 kg; height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m; % body fat: 20.0 ± 4.9) performed thirteen EO sessions twice a week and 48 hours apart. Maximal strength (MS), strength endurance (SE), and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2) tests were performed prior the beginning of the program, 96 hours Post the last training session (P13), seven and fourteen days afterwards as well (7D, and 14D).

Results: The main findings of this study were MS presented significant (P<0.05) increases at all Post-moments with no significant decrements until 14D. VO2 at respiratory compensation point presented a significant (P<0.05) decrease. Significant (P<0.05) increases in body mass and thigh circumferences were observed from P7 to 14P, with no significant (P<0.05) changes for % of body fat and arms circumferences.

Conclusion: We conclude that the EO program induce a MS increase and maintained until 14 days after training cessation, but the decrease in the VO2 at respiratory compensation point do not support its application to enhance endurance-training performance.

Keywords: Strength training; Endurance athletes; Maximal oxygen consumption; Respiratory compensation point; Performance maintenance

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