Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

Research Article, J Athl Enhanc Vol: 6 Issue: 4

Robotic Rehabilitation Treatment Influences Power and Active Straight Leg Raise Performance in Division II Female Athletes

Sara Lynn Terrell1*, Charles Ray Allen1 and James Lynch2

1Department of Exercise Science, Florida Southern College, USA

2Department of Athletic Training, Florida Southern College, USA

*Corresponding Author : Sara Lynn Terrell
Department of Exercise Science, Florida Southern College, 111 Lake Hollingsworth Drive, Gilbert Gym Annex, Lakeland, FL 33801, USA
Tel: 863-680-4436
Fax: 863-680-4251
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: May 02, 2017 Accepted: June 05, 2017 Published: June 09, 2017

Citation: Terrell SL, Allen CR, Lynch JM (2017) Robotic Rehabilitation Treatment Influences Power and Active Straight Leg Raise Performance in Division II Female Athletes. J Athl Enhanc 6:4. doi: 10.4172/2324-9080.1000267

Abstract

1.1 Background: Therapeutic robotic arm technology is a rehabilitation device for physical therapy that lengthens muscles using repeated precise and directed pressure. This therapy has improved range of motion, reduced pain, and improved activities for daily living in the general population. However, the impact of this therapy in improving sports performance in the competitive athlete population remains unclear. The purpose of this research was to explore the impact of a therapeutic robotic arm treatment on the vertical jump and the Active Straight Leg Raise test [ASLR] in Division II female athletes.

1.2 Methods: Twenty-one (n=21) competitive Division II athletes completed a vertical jump and active straight leg raise assessment before and after a 60 minute therapeutic robotic arm treatment on the bilateral hamstrings, quadriceps and hip flexor muscle groups.

1.3 Results: Mean vertical jump pre-testing height achieved for all athletes was 39.47 cm (SD=4.55) and declined to 35.52 cm (SD=4.34) post treatment (p < 0.001; 95% CI, 1.03-1.73). Basketball athletes vertical jump declined from 38.43 cm (SD=3.23) to 34.19 cm (SD=3.07) and volleyball athletes vertical jump declined from 40.64 cm (SD=5.61) to 37.82 cm (SD=4.88). ASLR scores improved in 66.6% of athletes presenting either a 2 or 1 composite score on the pre-test.

1.4 Conclusion: An acute robotic arm treatment attenuated vertical jump performance while improving ASLR in athletes presenting a reduced composite score. Maintaining performance throughout an entire season requires an integrated training and rehabilitation approach. Future research should examine the influence of multiple robotic treatments on various performance measures.

Keywords: Robotic arm technology; Technology intervention in sport performance; Vertical jump

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