Journal of Clinical & Experimental Radiology

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Perspective, J Clin Exp Radiol Vol: 4 Issue: 5

Study of the Stiffness of Tissues over Time during Radiotherapy Treatment Applied to Breast Cancer

Antony Bertrand-Grenier

University of Quebec at Trois-Rivieres, Canada

Abstract

Introduction: The fight against cancer is often hampered by the physical resistance of tumors and the collateral damage caused by treatments. Every year, several million people are treated with radiotherapy, a treatment that uses radiation to destroy cancer cells. In Canada, breast cancer remains the leading cause of death for women between the ages of 35 and 55, where the risk of reoffending ranges from 10% to 40% over 15 years. The difficulty of radiotherapy lies in the destruction of tumor cells while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal tissues, in particular by the collagen content and extracellular matrix. In addition to being a marker of malignancy, tumor stiffening can promote the proliferation of cancer cells and the migration of metastases. Radiation treatments induce a deposition of energy (dose) causing a local modification of the mechanical properties of the tissues. The study of these properties during radiotherapy treatment would provide new information on the radio resistance of tumors, the response to treatment and the risk of recurrence

Keywords: Radiotherapy, Radiation treatments

Introduction

The fight against cancer is often hampered by the physical resistance of tumors and the collateral damage caused by treatments. Every year, several million people are treated with radiotherapy, a treatment that uses radiation to destroy cancer cells. In Canada, breast cancer remains the leading cause of death for women between the ages of 35 and 55, where the risk of reoffending ranges from 10% to 40% over 15 years. The difficulty of radiotherapy lies in the destruction of tumor cells while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal tissues, in particular by the collagen content and extracellular matrix. In addition to being a marker of malignancy, tumor stiffening can promote the proliferation of cancer cells and the migration of metastases. Radiation treatments induce a deposition of energy (dose) causing a local modification of the mechanical properties of the tissues. The study of these properties during radiotherapy treatment would provide new information on the radio resistance of tumors, the response to treatment and the risk of recurrence.

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