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Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhancement Vol: 2 Issue: 5

Pelvis-Upper Trunk Coordination at Butterfly Stroke and Underwater Dolphin Kick: Application on an Elite Female Butterfly Swimmer

Thomas Nikodelis1*, Vasileios Konstantakos2, Ioannis Kosmadakis2 and Iraklis Kollias1
1Biomechanics Lab, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
2Electronics Lab, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Corresponding author : Thomas Nikodelis
Biomechanics Lab, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Greece
Tel: 00302351078132; Fax: 003023106363668
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 05, 2013 Accepted: November 09, 2013 Published: November 13, 2013
Citation: Nikodelis T, Konstantakos V, Kosmadakis I, Kollias I (2013) Pelvis-Upper Trunk Coordination at Butterfly Stroke and Underwater Dolphin Kick: Application on an Elite Female Butterfly Swimmer. J Athl Enhancement 2:5. doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000125

Abstract

Pelvis-Upper Trunk Coordination at Butterfly Stroke and Underwater Dolphin Kick: Application on an Elite Female Butterfly Swimmer

Swimming strokes kinematics are traditionally monitored, analyzed and extracted for a small part of a race. This practice may facilitate methodological limitations due to restricting issues arising from video analysis, though it is not scientifically solid, despite the cyclic nature of swimming movements, which may justify it. Skill level, swimming speed and fatigue are just some of the factors or constraints that may interfere with the cyclic nature of swimming and therefore affect inter-segmental coordination from stroke to stroke. There are studies that describe inter-segmental coordination in swimming using up to four consecutive stroke cycles. Nevertheless, studyinG coordination especially under the perspective of dynamic systems theory demands a large number of strokes to be analyzed in order to bring out the underlying coordination pattern, accounting also for its stability over time.

Keywords: Gyroscopes; Swimming biomechanics; Sensors; Butterfly stroke; Dolphin kick

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