Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

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Research Article, J Athl Enhancement Vol: 3 Issue: 6

Unilateral versus Bilateral Lower-body Resistance and Plyometric Training for Change of Direction Speed

Fisher J* and Wallin M
Centre for Health Exercise and Sport Science, Southampton Solent University, Southampton, UK
Corresponding author : James Fisher
Centre for Health Exercise and Sport Science, Southampton Solent University, East Park Terrace, Southampton, SO14 0YN, UK,
Tel: +44 2380 319000; Fax: +44 2380 337438 E-mail: [email protected]
Received: July 11, 2014 Accepted: September 08, 2014 Published: September 14, 2014
Citation: Fisher J, Wallin M (2014) Unilateral versus Bilateral Lower-body Resistance and Plyometric Training for Change of Direction Speed. J Athl Enhancement 3:6 doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000174

Abstract

Unilateral versus Bilateral Lower-body Resistance and Plyometric Training for Change of Direction Speed

Change of direction (COD) speed can be considered a key element in sports performance and as such research has considered multiple ways to improve COD performance. It has been shown that unilateral training produces greater muscle activation of the hip abductors than bilateral training, which in turn, are hypothesised to be significantly activated in change of direction movements. The aims of the present study were to compare progressive unilateral and bilateral lower body resistance and plyometric training on COD and linear speed performance. Fifteen collegiate male rugby players were randomly assigned to either unilateral (UNI; n=8) or bilateral (BIL; n=7) training groups. Both groups trained twice per week for 6 weeks, performing either UNI or BIL strength and plyometric exercises. Pre- and post-intervention testing included T- and Illinois agility tests, and 10m sprint. Data analysis revealed significantly greater improvements in absolute change in favour of the UNI group for T-test (p<0.05; UNI = -0.63 ± 0.36 seconds; BIL = -0.11 ± 0.03 seconds) and Illinois agility test (p=0.050; UNI = -0.80 ± 0.25 seconds; BIL = -0.50 ± 0.06 seconds). A significantly greater improvement in absolute change for the 10m sprint test was found for the BIL group (p=0.007; UNI = 0.01 ± 0.12 seconds; BIL = -0.07 ± 0.04 seconds).

Keywords: Strength training; Plyometric training; Illinois Agility; T-testThe Influence of Playing Position on the Biomechanical Demands of Netball Match-Play Netball is an intermittent and multi-directional team sport, played on a relatively small court. Rules restrict movement of certain positions within the court, and as such each of the seven positions has a unique physical, technical and tactical remit. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of playing position on mechanical loading during netball match-play.

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