International Publisher of Science, Technology and Medicine

Journal of Otology & Rhinology

Research Article

Development of a Short Version of the Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep Questionnaire for use with Children (DBAS-C10)

Sarah Blunden1*, Alice M Gregory2 and Megan R Crawford3
1Central Queensland University, Appelton Institute, 44 Greenhill Rd, Wayville, 5034, Australia
2Sleep Disorder Service and Research Centre, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
3Goldsmiths, University of London, Greater London WC1E 7HU, UK
Corresponding author : Sarah Blunden
Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Rd, Wayville, 5034, Australia
Tel: +61 8 8378 4513
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: December 26, 2012 Accepted: June 06, 2013 Published: August 10, 2013
Citation: Blunden S, Gregory AM, Crawford MR (2013) Development of a Short Version of the Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep Questionnaire for use with Children (DBAS-C10). J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2:3. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000115

Abstract

Development of a Short Version of the Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep Questionnaire for use with Children (DBAS-C10)

Background: Dysfunctional beliefs about sleep (DBAS) contribute to sleep problems. There is urgent need to develop a questionnaire addressing these beliefs in children. We aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a short version of the DBAS for use with children (DBAS-C10), adapted from the previous child and adult versions. Methods: Data were collected in 134 year 6/7 students [mean (SD) age = 12.73 y (.09y)] who completed the DBAS-C10 twice, either before and after a sleep education intervention (n=91) or before and after curriculum as usual (n=43). Exploratory factor analysis and validity testing were undertaken. Results: Three factors emerged (1) Beliefs about the immediate negative consequences of insomnia (items 1;6;7;9) (2) Beliefs about the long-term negative consequences of insomnia (items 2, 3;5;8) (3) Need to control the insomnia (items 4;10). In effect, only one difference from the adult factor structure resulted, item 2 moved from short term consequences to long term consequences of insomnia. Internal consistency of the scale was good (0.71), and the test retest reliability (when the questionnaire was completed 5-7 weeks apart) suggested consistency of responses. The questionnaire showed small sensitivity to change post intervention. Conclusions: This scale has acceptable psychometric properties and could be used to investigate dysfunctional beliefs in children and potentially detect changes in sleep related cognitions in children in treatment interventions.

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