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Journal of Sleep Disorders : Treatment & Care
Editorial Board: Nune Darbinian-Sarkissian, PhD
Temple University, USA  view all
ISSN: 2325-9639
Frequency: Bimonthly
 
Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal and aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all areas of sleep medicine and making them available online freely without any restrictions or any other subscriptions to researchers worldwide.
 

Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care focuses on the topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Physiology of Sleep & Wakefulness
  • Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder
  • Phenomenology of sleep disorders
  • Pharmacotherapy of sleep disorders
  • Aging and sleep
  • Developmental aspects of sleep
 
The journal is using Editorial Manager System for quality in review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking systems. Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care or outside experts; at least two independent reviewers approval followed by editor approval is required for acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the system, hopefully to publication. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor. Editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process.
 
Submit manuscript at http://www.editorialmanager.com/scitechnol/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.jsdtc@scitechnol.com or editor.jsdtc@scitechnol.org
 
Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care is organizing & supporting 2nd International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia which is going to be held during September 23-25, 2014, at Valencia Convention Centre, Valencia, Spain with the respective theme Advanced Diagnostic & Therapeutic Approaches Towards Dementia.
 
Current Issue
The Association between Sleep Disorders and Fine Manual Dexterity in Adolescent and Young Adults with Down syndrome   Research Article
CC (JJ) Chen and SDR Ringenbach
J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2325-9639.1000132
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The Association between Sleep Disorders and Fine Manual Dexterity in Adolescent and Young Adults with Down syndrome

Background: The high prevalence of fine motor deficits in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is well documented. However, only a few studies have focused on individuals with Down syndrome. In particular, given the presence of sleep disorders and fine motor deficits in this population, more work is needed to examine the effect of sleep disorders on the performance of fine motor skills in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: Thirty adolescents and young adults with DS participated in the present study. Parents used a validated questionnaire to measure sleep problems in individuals with DS. Fine motor skill, measured by the Purdue Pegboard test (e.g., fine motor dexterity), were also measured in this study. Based on previous studies, we first tested the relationship between chronological age, mental age, and the performance of the Purdue pegboard test. In addition, we tested whether different factors of sleep disorders lead to impaired fine manual dexterity.

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Concordance of Mother/Child Sleep Patterns Using Actigraphy: Preliminary Findings   Research Article
Suzanne E Goldman, Lily Wang and Diane B Fawkes
J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2325-9639.1000133
 Preview

Concordance of Mother/Child Sleep Patterns Using Actigraphy: Preliminary Findings

Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and are often associated with problem behaviors. Problematic sleep in the child may impact maternal sleep. We examined the association of sleep in mother-child dyads to child daytime behavior and maternal insomnia and daytime sleepiness in 11 children with ASD and 6 children of typical development (TD) using wrist actigraphs over 14 consecutive nights. Early morning wakenings were significantly associated with poorer daytime behavior as measured by the Child Behavior Checklist in both ASD and TD children. Additionally, associations were found between mother and child sleep and between the child’s sleep and maternal daytime sleepiness. These results highlight the need to consider the potential interaction of maternal-child sleep in future studies.

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Benefit of a Contemporary Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT): Patient and Clinician Evaluation   Research Article
Stuart MacKay, Niall Jefferson, Andrew Jones, Terry Sands, Charmaine Woods and Marco Raftopulous
J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2325-9639.1000134
 Preview

Benefit of a Contemporary Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT): Patient and Clinician Evaluation

Background and Objective: Multiple Health Care Professionals contribute to the care of the sleep disordered patient, particularly those with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of a Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) clinic (with the patient +/-family support in attendance), to both the clinician AND the patient. Methods: The utility of the clinic, in which multiple clinicians jointly review sleep disordered patients and engaged in open discussion with patients and family member(s) about all treatment modalities, was evaluated using an 18-item patient questionnaire (6 pre-clinic, 12 post-clinic questions) and a 6-item clinician questionnaire (6 post-clinic questions). At the completion of 5 consecutive (monthly) clinics, an independent clinician (not present at the clinics), synthesised the data and arranged for statistical analysis. Results: Patient understanding of options available in managing their OSA/sleep disorder increased from 20.7% to 89.7% (p<0.05), and awareness of OSA as a chronic disorder increased from 62.1% to 96.6% (p<0.05), following clinic attendance. In 31.8% of cases seen at the MDT, clinicians reported the patient did not receive the treatment expected (p<0.05), and the initial proposed management had some adjustment made in 59.7% of cases (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of a Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) as in the model presented, appears to benefit both patients and clinicians in the management of OSA/sleep disorders.

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The Importance of Habitual Sleep Position in Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Asians   Research Article
Naricha Chirakalwasan, Busarakum Teerapraipruk, Lalitha Pereirasamy
J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2325-9639.1000135
 Preview

The Importance of Habitual Sleep Position in Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Asians

Introduction: Our prior investigation found positional sleep apnea accounting for approximately 70% of Asian obstructive sleep apnea patients. We hypothesized that the habitual side sleeping may indicate an obstructive sleep apnea deterring mechanism. Method: We retrospectively reviewed 542 polysomnographic studies from our sleep laboratory. We included adult patients with respiratory disturbance index ≥ 5 from baseline polysomnography. Habitual sleep position was obtained from the pretest questionnaire. Results: Forty-eight percent were noted to be habitual supinesleepers. Most habitual non-supine sleepers were habitual side sleepers with predominantly right-sided preference. Most habitual side sleepers when compared to habitual back sleepers were found to be more female, having higher body mass index, and reported more frequent snoring. We also found the differences in polysomnographic findings in which lower mean oxygen saturation and higher non-supine respiratory disturbance index were observed in habitual side sleepers as compared to habitual back sleepers. Only female sex was a significant predictor for being a habitual side sleeper. Total respiratory disturbance index, age>60, and wake after sleep onset >30 minutes appeared as risk factors for developing cardiovascular-related diseases in habitual side sleeping obstructive sleep apnea patients.

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The Effect of Healing Touch on Sleep Patterns of Pediatric Burn Patients: A Prospective Pilot Study   Research Article
Lois Cone, Michele M Gottschlich, Jane Khoury, Narong Simakajornboon and Richard J Kagan
J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2325-9639.1000136
 Preview

The Effect of Healing Touch on Sleep Patterns of Pediatric Burn Patients: A Prospective Pilot Study

Objective: Prior experience has demonstrated poor sleep quality during and after hospitalization for thermal injury. Complementary therapies such as healing touch are increasingly utilized in the management of pain, anxiety, wound treatment and sleep disorders; however, the efficacy of healing touch during burn convalescence is unknown. The primary aim of this investigation was to determine if healing touch mediates polysomnographic changes during nocturnal sleep in pediatric burn patients. Methods: Subjects were randomized to one of two groups to determine the order of healing touch treatment night verses no intervention. The study utilized a 2 period crossover design whereby patients served as their own control. Healing touch was performed on one randomly assigned night while soft background music and polysomnography recordings were obtained on both nights for each patient.

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