Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

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Research Article, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 3 Issue: 2

Benefit of a Contemporary Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT): Patient and Clinician Evaluation

Stuart MacKay1*, Niall Jefferson2, Andrew Jones3, Terry Sands4, Charmaine Woods5 and Marco Raftopulous6
1Illawarra ENT Head & Neck Clinic, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
2Accredited Otolaryngology Registrar, The Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
3Illawarra Sleep Disorders Service, Senior Lecturer, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
4Illawarra Sleep Disorders Service, Department of Paediatrics, The Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
5Department of Otolaryongology, Head and Neck Surgery,Flinders Medical Centre and Flinders University,Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
6Senior Resident Medical Officer, The Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Corresponding author : Stuart MacKay
Illawarra ENT Head and Neck Clinic, Suite 1 & 2/8-10 Victoria Street,Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia
Tel: 02 42261055; Fax: 02 42276292
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 28, 2013 Accepted: March 03, 2014 Published: March 06, 2014
Citation: MacKay S, Jefferson N, Jones A, Sands T, Woods C (2014) Benefit of a Contemporary Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT): Patient and Clinician Evaluation. J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 3:2. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000134

Abstract

Benefit of a Contemporary Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT): Patient and Clinician Evaluation

Background and Objective: Multiple Health Care Professionals contribute to the care of the sleep disordered patient, particularly those with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of a Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) clinic (with the patient +/-family support in attendance), to both the clinician AND the patient. Methods: The utility of the clinic, in which multiple clinicians jointly review sleep disordered patients and engaged in open discussion with patients and family member(s) about all treatment modalities, was evaluated using an 18-item patient questionnaire (6 pre-clinic, 12 post-clinic questions) and a 6-item clinician questionnaire (6 post-clinic questions). At the completion of 5 consecutive (monthly) clinics, an independent clinician (not present at the clinics), synthesised the data and arranged for statistical analysis. Results: Patient understanding of options available in managing their OSA/sleep disorder increased from 20.7% to 89.7% (p<0.05), and awareness of OSA as a chronic disorder increased from 62.1% to 96.6% (p<0.05), following clinic attendance. In 31.8% of cases seen at the MDT, clinicians reported the patient did not receive the treatment expected (p<0.05), and the initial proposed management had some adjustment made in 59.7% of cases (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of a Sleep Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) as in the model presented, appears to benefit both patients and clinicians in the management of OSA/sleep disorders.

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