Journal of Addictive Behaviors,Therapy & RehabilitationISSN: 2324-9005

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Research Article, J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil Vol: 2 Issue: 3

Initial Pilot Test of a Group- Texting Intervention to Sustain Opioid Abstinence Following Residential Detoxification and Treatment

Angela L Stotts1*, Thomas F Northrup1 and William D Norwood2
1Department of Family and Community Medicine & Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
2Department of Clinical, Health, and Applied Sciences, University of Houston – Clear Lake, Houston, Texas 77058, USA
Corresponding author : Angela L Stotts
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 6431 Fannin, JJL 324, Houston, TX, 77030, USA
Tel: (713)500-7590; Fax: (713)500-7598
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: March 27, 2013 Accepted: August 22, 2013 Published: August 24, 2013
Citation: Stotts AL, Northrup TF, Norwood WD (2013) Initial Pilot Test of a Group-Texting Intervention to Sustain Opioid Abstinence Following Residential Detoxification and Treatment. J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 2:3. doi:10.4172/2324-9005.1000110

Abstract

Initial Pilot Test of a Group- Texting Intervention to Sustain Opioid Abstinence Following Residential Detoxification and Treatment

Relapse to opioids is common among detoxified patients following discharge from residential treatment. Mobile phone, group-texting technology offers an innovative method for delivering effective, lowcost aftercare during this critical period. Recent research suggests acceptance and mindfulness processes might be useful targets in opioid detoxification. An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) group-texting intervention was developed and tested in a small pilot study (N=10) with detoxified opioid patients in residential treatment (RT). Participants received 6 ACT-based group sessions while in RT and 4 weeks of ACT group-text messaging following discharge. Overall, the intervention was well received and feasible. Half of the participants received 5 or 6 RT sessions and replied to post-discharge texting prompts. Texting content was generally ACT-consistent, however, the frequency of texts was lower than expected. Two participants sent fewer than 10 texts, and three participants texted between 11 and 20 times during the monthlong intervention. Focus groups indicated acceptability and recommended adjustments to the intervention. ACT mechanisms changed in theoretically predicted ways: Experiential avoidance related to drug and other cues was reduced, and both acceptance and values-driven action were increased across treatment. Preliminary data suggest promise for the novel ACT-based grouptexting intervention, which ultimately, with further development, may be a successful adjunct to aftercare treatment for recently detoxified opioid dependent patients.

Keywords: opioid dependence, opioid detoxification, text messaging, ACT, acceptance and commitment therapy

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