Journal of Athletic EnhancementISSN: 2324-9080

Research Article, J Athl Enhancement Vol: 2 Issue: 3

An Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Device Reduces Blood Lactate Concentrations More Effectively Than Passive Recovery after Wingate Testing

Emily Hanson1*, Kevin Stetter2, Rui Li3 and Adam Thomas4
1Boston Children’s Hospital Division of Sports Medicine, The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Boston, MA, USA
2Somerset Medical Sports Performance and Rehabilitation Center, NJ, USA
3Northeastern University Health Science Department, Boston, MA, USA
4Northeastern University Athletic Training Education Program, Boston, MA, USA
Corresponding author : Emily Hanson
ATC, Boston Children’s Hospital Division of Sports Medicine, The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Boston, MA, USA
Tel: 7813732670
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: April 04, 2013 Accepted: July 15, 2013 Published: July 20, 2013
Citation: Hanson E, Stetter K, Li R, Thomas A (2013) An Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Device Reduces Blood Lactate Concentrations More Effectively Than Passive Recovery after Wingate Testing. J Athl Enhancement 2:3. doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000115

Abstract

An Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Device Reduces Blood Lactate Concentrations More Effectively Than Passive Recovery after Wingate Testing

With the advancement of technology, therapeutic modalities mimicking “cool down” have become an option for active individuals to try and decrease the recovery time between training sessions and competition. A wide variety of companies that manufacture these modalities have claimed their  machines can decrease recovery time by decreasing lactic acid, a known cause of muscle fatigue following exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate an intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) unit as a recovery modality by evaluating its effectiveness in clearing blood lactate (BLa) when compared to alternate recovery methods following an anaerobic Wingate cycling test (WAnT).

Keywords: Intermittent pneumatic compression; Blood lactate, Recovery; Performance

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