Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

Reach Us +18507546199
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Research Article, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 2 Issue: 3

Neurocognitive and Psychosocial Outcomes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Hong Kong Chinese: Similar to or Different from Western Populations?

Esther Yuet Ying Lau1*, Mary Sau Man Ip2,3, Tatia Mei Chun Lee4,5, April Wai Man Yeung1,3 and Gail A Eskes6,7
1Sleep Laboratory, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3Queen Mary Hospital, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong
4Laboratory of Neuropsychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
5State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
6Departments of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
7Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Canada
Corresponding author : Esther Yuet Ying Lau
663, Jockey Club Tower, Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
Tel: (852) 3917 7035; Fax: (852) 2858 3518
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: May 30, 2013 Accepted: August 16, 2013 Published: August 20, 2013
Citation: Ying Lau EY, Man Ip MS, Chun Lee TM, Man Yeung AW, Eskes GA (2013) Neurocognitive and Psychosocial Outcomes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Hong Kong Chinese: Similar to or Different from Western Populations? J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 2:3. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000117

Abstract

Neurocognitive and Psychosocial Outcomes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Hong Kong Chinese: Similar to or Different from Western Populations?

Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has long been associated with daytime consequences. However, systematic and comprehensive studies on the neuropsychological functioning among Chinese patients with OSA were lacking. This study aimed to investigate the functioning of individuals with OSA using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, experimental tasks based on a well-specified paradigm of working memory (WM), and questionnaires measuring a wide spectrum of psychosocial functioning, thereby establishing a neurocognitive and psychosocial profile of Hong Kong Chinese with OSA, in comparison to western populations. Methods: Twenty-five patients with moderate to severe OSA and 30 healthy controls were recruited from the Sleep Disorders Centre of Queen Mary Hospital and the community, respectively. Participants were tested on attention and working memory, verbal and visual learning and recall, executive functions, and processing speed, and completed self-reported measures on daytime sleepiness, sleep quality, mood, functional outcomes, and quality of life.

Keywords:

Track Your Manuscript

Share This Page