Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

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Short Communication, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 9 Issue: 6

Effects of Sleep Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)

Shabad Harika*

Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India

*Corresponding Author:
Shabad Harika
Department of Microbiology
Osmania University, Hyderabad, India
Tel: 9000370499
E-mail:
[email protected]

Received: December 08, 2020 Accepted: December 22, 2020 Published: December 29, 2020

Citation: Harika S (2020) Effects of Sleep Bruxism (Teeth Grinding). J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 9:6. (250)

Abstract

Bruxism is a condition in which you grinding, gnash or clench your teeth. If you have bruxism, you may unconsciously grind your teeth when you're awake in day time (awake bruxism) or clench or grind them during sleep (sleep bruxism).

Sleep bruxism is considered a sleep-related disorder. People who clench or grind their teeth during sleep are more likely to have so any other sleep disorders, such as snoring and pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) etc.

Mild bruxism may not require the treatment. However, in some people, bruxism can be frequent and severe to lead to jaw disorders, headaches, damaged teeth and so many other problems.

If you have sleep bruxism and be unaware of it until complications develop in the body, it's important to know the signs and symptoms of bruxism and seek regular dental care.

Keywords: bruxism

Introduction

Bruxism is a condition in which you grinding, gnash or clench your teeth. If you have bruxism, you may unconsciously grind your teeth when you're awake in day time (awake bruxism) or clench or grind them during sleep (sleep bruxism).

Sleep bruxism is considered a sleep-related disorder. People who clench or grind their teeth during sleep are more likely to have so any other sleep disorders, such as snoring and pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) etc.

Mild bruxism may not require the treatment. However, in some people, bruxism can be frequent and severe to lead to jaw disorders, headaches, damaged teeth and so many other problems.

If you have sleep bruxism and be unaware of it until complications develop in the body, it's important to know the signs and symptoms of bruxism and seek regular dental care.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of bruxism may include:

  • Teeth grinding or clenching, which may be loud enough to wake up the sleep partner
  • Teeth which are flattened, fractured, chipped or loose
  • Worn tooth enamel, exposing to the deeper layers of the teeth inside
  • Increased tooth pain or sensitivity
  • Tight jaw muscles, or a locked jaw that will not open or close completely
  • Jaw, neck or face pain or soreness
  • Pain that feels like an earache, though it's actually not a problem with the ear
  • Dull headache starting in the temples
  • Damage in chewing on the inside of the cheek
  • Sleep disruption or

Causes

Doctors still don not understand completely what causes bruxism, but it may be due to a combination of physical, psychological and genetic factors.

Awake bruxism may be due to many reasons such as emotions, anxiety, stress, anger, frustration or tension. Or it may be a strategy or a habit during deep concentration.

Sleep bruxism may be a sleep-related chewing activity associated with arousals during the sleep or awake.sequent, to possess the work checked and to assess your oral health.

Risk Factors

These factors increase your risk of bruxism:

Stress: Increased emotions or stress can lead to teeth grinding.

Age: Bruxism is common in small children, but it usually goes away by adulthood.

Personality type: Having a personality like angry, competitive or hyperactive can increase your risk of bruxism.

Medications and other substances: Bruxism may be an uncommon side effect of some psychiatric medications, such as certain antidepressants. Smoking, drinking caffeine beverages or alcohol, or using recreational drugs may increase the risk of bruxism.

Family members with bruxism: Sleep bruxism will occur in families. If you have bruxism problem, other members of the family also may have bruxism or a history of it.

Other disorders: Bruxism can be form with some mental health and medical disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), epilepsy, night terrors, sleep-related disorders such as sleep apnea, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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