Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

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Case Report, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 1 Issue: 2

Self-Report Somatic Arousal Correlates with Sleep Complaints among Females with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Pilot Study

Joan E. Broderick1, Morris S. Gold3, Mohammad M. Amin2 and Avram R. Gold2*
1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11974, USA
2Division of Pulmonary/Critical Care/Sleep Medicine Stony, Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794 and the DVA Medical Center, Northport, NY 11768, USA
3Biostatistician, Novartis Consumer Health, Parsippany, NJ 07054-2176, USA
Corresponding author : Avram R. Gold
MD (111D), DVA Medical Center, Northport, NY 11768, USA
Tel: (631) 261-4400 ext 7696; Fax: (631) 266-6016
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 08, 2012 Accepted: September 13, 2012 Published: September 17, 2012
Citation: Broderick JE, Gold MS, Amin MM, Gold AR (2012) Self-Report Somatic Arousal Correlates with Sleep Complaints among Females with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Pilot Study. J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 1:2. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000103

Abstract

Self-Report Somatic Arousal Correlates with Sleep Complaints among Females with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Pilot Study


 Study objectives: To investigate the relationship between somatic arousal and sleep complaints among females with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), we compared self-report and objective measures of somatic arousal between females with IBS and healthy females correlating the somatic arousal measures with self-report measures of sleepiness, fatigue and sleep quality.
Methods: Twelve females with IBS and 12 healthy females had measurement of oral temperature, heart rate and the difference in heart rate between periods of wakefulness and sleep during polysomnography (HR PSG w–s). Self-report somatic arousal was obtained using the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire anxious arousal subscale (MASQaas). Sleepiness, fatigue and sleep quality were assessed with the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), fatigue severity scale (FSS), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively.
Results: The MASQaas score distinguished females with IBS from controls and for all participants, correlated significantly with the ESS, FSS and PSQI. Among objective measures, only the HR PSG w-s separated significantly between groups and none of the objective measures correlated with self-report sleepiness, fatigue or sleep quality. For all participants, the MASQaas score correlated significantly with the HR PSG w-s.
Conclusions: Our findings provide preliminary support for quantifying somatic arousal by self-report and for somatic arousal being associated with poor sleep quality among females with IBS.

Keywords: Irritable bowel syndrome; Central sensitization syndromes; Somatic arousal; Physiologic hyperarousal; Sympathetic nervous system; Sleep quality

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