Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

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Research Article, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 4 Issue: 1

Sleep Parameters and Architecture in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Comparison with Typically Developing Peers and Across Subtypes

Tamara A Speth1, Andre Benoit1 and Penny V Corkum1-5*
1Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Canada
2Departments of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Canada
3Departments of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Canada
4Departments of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, Canada
5ADHD Clinic, Colchester Regional Hospital, Canada
Corresponding author : Dr. Penny Corkum
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, PO BOX 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4R2
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 11, 2014 Accepted: November 12, 2014 Published: November 14, 2014
Citation: Speth TA, Benoit A, Corkum PV (2015) Sleep Parameters and Architecture in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Comparison with Typically Developing Peers and Across Subtypes. J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 4:1. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000149

Abstract

Sleep Parameters and Architecture in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Comparison with Typically Developing Peers and Across Subtypes

Sleep problems in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common, yet poorly understood. Furthermore, little research has been done to compare sleep between subtypes of children with ADHD. The current study used polysomnography to investigate sleep architecture and sleep parameters in a rigorously diagnosed, medication-naïve, age- and sex-matched sample of children with ADHD and their typically developing (TD) peers. Sleep was compared between 25 children with ADHD and 25 TD children between 6 and 12 years of age, and between children with different subtypes of ADHD. Results indicate that children with ADHD took longer to fall asleep than their TD peers; however, no other differences in sleep between the two groups were identified. Furthermore, no differences were found in any sleep parameters or sleep architecture variables between ADHD subtypes. Future research should continue to investigate sleep in children with ADHD by investigating additional sleep variables including nocturnal movement, stage shifts per hour, and sleep microstructure.

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