Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and CareISSN: 2325-9639

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Review Article, J Sleep Disor Treat Care Vol: 3 Issue: 3

The Effect of Lifestyle Interventions on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and the Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review

Alex S.W. Lowe1,2*, Irshaad O. Ebrahim1, and Adrian J. Williams1
1The London Sleep Centre, 137 Harley Street, London, W1G 6BF, United Kingdom
2Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, SS0 0RY, United Kingdom
Corresponding author : Dr Alex Lowe
The London Sleep Centre, 137 Harley Street, London, W1G 6BF, United Kingdom
Tel: 020 7725 0523; Fax: 020 7725 0524
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: June 04, 2013 Accepted: April 21, 2014 Published: April 23, 2014
Citation: Lowe ASW, Ebrahim IO, Williams AJ (2014) The Effect of Lifestyle Interventions on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and the Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review. J Sleep Disor: Treat Care 3:3. doi:10.4172/2325-9639.1000139

Abstract

The Effect of Lifestyle Interventions on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and the Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review

Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and the metabolic syndrome are frequently found together and obesity may be fundamental to development of both conditions. Modifications to lifestyle, such as diet and exercise, can reduce weight and should therefore be beneficial to their management. The aim of this article was to review the current literature that has investigated the impact of lifestyle interventions on OSA severity and components of the metabolic syndrome in order to help identify which patients could gain the most benefit. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature for relevant human studies using PubMed, Medline, and EMBASE from 8th February 2004 to 7th February 2014. Results: Our search identified 35 studies. There was a wide range in study designs, often with limited information on the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. The majority of interventions focused on OSA severity and weight loss with fewer studies that assessed measures of glucose intolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. OSA severity and weight were most consistently improved and patients with more severe OSA improved their apnoea-hypopnoea index to a greater extent.

Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnoea, metabolic syndrome, lifestyle, diet, exercise

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