Dental Health: Current ResearchISSN: 2470-0886

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Editorial, Dent Health Curr Res Vol: 7 Issue: 7

Dental Morphology and Overview of Formation of Dentition

Rahena Akhter*

School of Dentistry and Health Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Australia

*Corresponding Author:

Rahena Akhter
School of Dentistry and Health Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Australia
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: July 01, 2021; Accepted Date: July 09, 2021 ; Published Date: August 19, 2021

Citation: Akhter R (2021) Dental Morphology and Overview of Formation of Dentition. Dent Health Curr Res 7:7. e113.

Copyright: © All articles published in Dental Health: Current Research are the property of SciTechnol, and is protected by copyright laws. Copyright © 2021, SciTechnol, All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

 

Humans have two arrangements of teeth in the course of their life. The primary set of teeth to be seen within the mouth is that the primary or deciduous dentition, which begins to make prenatally at approximately 14 weeks in utero and is completed postnatally at approximately 3 years aged. Within the absence of congenital disorders, dental disease, or trauma, the primary teeth during this dentition begin to seem within the mouth at the mean age of 6 months, and therefore the last emerge at a mean age of 28 ± 4 months. The deciduous dentition remains intact (barring loss from cavity or trauma) until the kid is approximately 6 years aged. At approximately that point, the primary succedaneous or permanent teeth begin to emerge into the mouth. The emergence of those teeth begins the transition or mixed dentition period, during which there's a mix of deciduous and succedaneous teeth present.

Keywords: Dental health, Enamel, Tooth decay, Dentition

Dentition

Humans have two arrangements of teeth in the course of their life. The primary set of teeth to be seen within the mouth is that the primary or deciduous dentition, which begins to make prenatally at approximately 14 weeks in utero and is completed postnatal at approximately 3 years aged. Within the absence of congenital disorders, dental disease, or trauma, the primary teeth during this dentition begin to seem within the mouth at the mean age of 6 months, and therefore the last emerge at a mean age of 28 ± 4 months. The deciduous dentition remains intact (barring loss from cavity or trauma) until the kid is approximately 6 years aged. At approximately that point, the primary succedaneous or permanent teeth begin to emerge into the mouth. The emergence of those teeth begins the transition or mixed dentition period, during which there’s a mix of deciduous and succedaneous teeth present. The progress period keeps going from around 6 to 12 years matured and closes when every one of the deciduous teeth is shed. By then, the lasting dentition time frame starts. Hence the change from the primary dentition to the permanent dentition starts with the rise of the main lasting molars, shedding of the deciduous incisors, and rise of the lasting incisors. The mixed dentition period is usually a difficult time for the young child due to habits, missing teeth, teeth of various colours and hues, crowding of the teeth, and mal posed teeth.

Dental morphology

Human gross anatomy presents many instances of biologic variation, and for future dental educational planning a greater number of samples of dental morphology variation should be used. An easy investigation into the external morphology of the human tooth clearly shows three distinct parts:

Crown: the highest a part of the tooth covered in its external layer with enamel tissue. It’s the sole part you’ll normally see when someone is smiling, though a little a part of it’s going to be covered by the gums. The form of the tooth’s crown determines its function. The incisors and canine teeth are very sharp and chisel-shaped for cutting; premolars and molars have two or more cusps for grinding. The coronal a part of the human tooth consists of two hard tissues: enamel and dentin, this includes the dental pulp, located within the crown.

Gumline: this is often the part of the tooth between the crown and the root. It’s where the gums meet the crown and the cemento enamel junction is found. This line (also referred to as the cervical line) is definitely visible to the eye due to the colour difference between enamel and cementum.

Root: this is often the part of the tooth that’s embedded within the bone. The basis of a tooth makes up about two-third of its whole structure. It’s covered with cementum.

These three parts of human teeth play distinct functions within the mouth. Their anatomical features, size, and shapes are directly associated with their ability to tear and crush the food. Incisor and canine crowns have four surfaces and a ridge (a linear elevation on the surface of a tooth), whereas premolar and molar crowns have five surfaces. The surfaces are named consistent with their positions and functions.

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